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NEWS STORIES

Use caution, and know the fireworks laws this Independence DaySubmitted: 07/02/2013
Story By Lyndsey Stemm


RHINELANDER - Independence Day and fireworks go hand in hand. Unfortunately so do fireworks and injuries.

So before you start lighting fuses, the Oneida County Health Department has a few safety tips. Their first tip -- just don't light off fireworks.

They'd like for you to leave fireworks to the professionals. But if you do decide to celebrate the holiday with a bang, the department has two major pieces of advice.

"A: we want to make sure that adults are the ones lighting the fireworks out of reach of children. And don't let the children ignite the fireworks. Never trust a dud. Let it sit and then douse it with water. Another thing would be always having water handy," says Rob Deede, an Oneida County Public Health Nurse.

Deede says letting kids play with fireworks is the biggest mistake people make. He also reminds you to follow directions on the packaging, never point a firework at another person, only light one firework at time and leave pets inside.

The Oneida County Health Department has more firework safety tips on their website- you can find that on our links page.

Each town has its own rules about which fireworks you're allowed to have.

Rhinelander has a ban on anything that explodes or leaves the ground, unless you have a permit. That means inside the city limits you can only use smaller fireworks that do things like make noise, and shower sparklers.

Police will be on the lookout for people breaking the rules.

"Our city adopts the state statutes concerning fireworks. You would be looking at roughly a $263.50 fine for a fireworks violation within the City of Rhinelander. Certainly, that amount can change if it's in one of the outlying townships or other communities within the county," says Ron Lueneburg from the Rhinelander Police Department.

You're responsible for fining out what your town allows. And if you let things get out of control and set something on fire, you'll be held responsible.

Captain Lueneburg recommends leaving the pyrotechnics to the professionals. Rhinelander's fireworks show will be Thursday night over Boom Lake.



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