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Study say Americans don't love their cars as much as they used toSubmitted: 07/02/2013

Adam Fox
10 p.m. Anchor/Reporter
afox@wjfw.com


RHINELANDER - Most Americans love hot dogs, fireworks and beer on Independence Day.

But another American love affair could be changing.

A new study from the University of Michigan says Americans are becoming less attached to their cars.

The number of registered cars, trucks, vans and SUVs has gone down since the recession.

But Travis Trickey has sold cars for a decade.

He says business at Rhinelander Toyota is on the rise.

"People are still apprehensive from the big swing from 2007,2008 and 2009, Trickey said. "People are looking more now trying to fit into their budget obviouisly, but they are still looking for vehicles that have gadgets and gizmos."

One likely reason for that is the Northwoods lack of public transportation.

The Michigan study says young adults are most likely to shun vehicles.

But Rick Kenoedler thinks that's on the car manufacturers.

"I think a lot depends on what the car manufactuers are producing," Kenoedler said. "If its something exciting, people get excited about it and want them. If they are just boring transportation cars, whats there to be excited about."

The number of registered vehicles peaked at 236 million in 2008.

The Michigan researchers say that number is likely to rise again because of the improving economy.



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 IN OTHER NEWS
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 05/26/2016

- We'll give you a Wausau chiropractor's reaction to a proposed state bill that would allow chiropractors to write prescriptions for narcotics.

- Plus, we asked Governor Scott Walker for his reaction to the transgender directive for which the Obama administration is being sued by several states including Wisconsin.

We'll bring you the details on these stories and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

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AMHERST - The small town of Amherst recently broke ground to replace their aging dam.

The dam was built on the Tomorrow River decades ago for power to the local feed mill.

The Wisconsin DNR believes the structure does not meet it's 500 year flood criteria.

This designation gave the town residents a choice.

"The determination of the DNR that the dam had to meet the 500 year flood lead us to the idea that we had to be able to release more water. The DNR basically brought this to the forefront and the village responded then," says Amherst Village President Michael Juris

This close knit town of just over 1000 residents took the decision very seriously.

"The residents of the village really had the opportunity to speak on what they wanted the vision of their village to be for the future. Whether to maintain the dam and the pond or to take it out and rehab it," says Juris.

Residents chose to keep the dam and thus the millpond.

With the decision made, the bidding process moved quickly and work has just started.

The new improved structure will use parts of the current one.

"Basically the stop plug structure of the dam is going to remain as it is because we found that in order to meet the 500 year flood requirements of the DNR we're going to be able to use the water that flows through the generating station," states Juris.

There were many options on the table and some that were just too expensive.

"It's been our determination that to dredge the millpond would be an expense that the taxpayers of the village at this time aren't going to be able to shoulder," says Juris

Still, bracing the structure to meet the DNR's strict 500 year criteria does not come cheap.

"We spent a fair amount of time in discussion before this decision was made because this is an expensive decision for a community our size. The original estimate was around 1.2 million dollars," says Juris.

Work moves quickly in Amherst as a completion date is set for this September.

"We expect that the substantial completion will be towards the end of August and with final completion early in September," says Juris.

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ONEIDA COUNTY - Oneida County will soon house a lot more inmates and get paid for it.

The Oneida County Sheriff's Office recently signed a contract with Wisconsin to keep state prisoners in the county jail.

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THREE LAKES - You may soon be able to ride your ATV on parts of State Highway 32 in Three Lakes, if the state DOT approves the new route in the next few weeks.

The Three Lakes Nicolet ATV Club wants to connect downtown Three Lakes to the Nicolet National Forest.

To do that, it needs to open up parts of a six-mile portion of Highway 32 from Town Road X or Javen Road to Lake Julia Road.

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ST. GERMAIN - The unofficial start to the summer season in the Northwoods will come this Memorial Day weekend.

That means our lakes will be busy and piers will be in use.

Pier of d'Nort steps up to that demand.

The idea for Pier of d'Nort came to owner Carl Surges after he installed his parents' pier.

The business started in Hartford, Wisconsin, in the mid 2000s. Then it relocated a few years later to St. Germain.

Now Pier of d'Nort is swamped with orders this time of year.

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LANGLADE COUNTY - Langlade County wants to become the new home for the state's forestry headquarters.

Lawmakers have asked the DNR to consider moving the department's headquarters from Madison to northern Wisconsin.

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THREE LAKES - First responders respond to different emergency calls every day. 

Those calls can be more challenging if they are trying to help someone who has autism.

A Northwoods group is encouraging local fire and police departments to train how to work with people with autism.

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