Loading

60°F

55°F

59°F

55°F

58°F

62°F

59°F

60°F

55°F

60°F

60°F

59°F
Search
NEWS STORIES

Volunteers us sonar to 'hear' and track bats for the DNRSubmitted: 06/27/2013
Story By Kailey Burton


MANITOWISH WATERS - Farmers and anyone who hates mosquitos should be VERY thankful for bats. The journal ‘Science' estimates they provide US farmers with 3.7 billion dollars in pest control.

In nearby states though a fungal infection called White Nose Syndrome is killing them by the thousands. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is working on a plan for our bat population, but first they have to find them.

Bats are small, hard to see, and mostly silent to the human ear. However, with special sonar equipment we can hear them, and track them. The DNR wants to use this technology to study Wisconsin's four bat species most at risk.

"Those are the hibernating bats and those are the bats that are susceptible to White Nose Syndrome because it is a cold loving fungus that attacks and gets the bats during hibernation," said Licia Johnson with the North Lakeland Discovery Center, "Some do leave the state and go down to Illinois to hibernate where there has been White Nose Syndrome found in caves."

North Lakeland Discover Center has trained 80 volunteers so far to use sonar equipment to track bats. All the information they gather goes to the DNR's database.

"If we ever were to have an issue with our bat population, white nose syndrome infecting our bats and getting a large amount we would know baseline information of how many bats we had where they were located throughout the state, so if there ever was a reintroduction program necessary they would have that information."

For more information about the North Lakeland Discovery Center or the bat monitoring program, click the links below.


Related Weblinks:
North Lakeland Discovery Center
Wisconsin Bat Monitoring Program

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

EAGLE RIVER - Many people enjoy freshly roasted coffee. But, the process to roast those coffee beans can be a science.

"We start with green coffee. It comes in 130 to 155 pound sacks of coffee," said owner of Eagle River Roasters Dan Beihoff.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - People in the Northwoods got the chance to try a variety of beer, wine, and food on Saturday.

Hodag Hops and Vines was held in Rhinelander.

There were many different breweries from Wisconsin and the Midwest at the event.

The Rhinelander Area Chamber of Commerce relies on volunteers to help with the event.

+ Read More

MADISON - A Wisconsin lawmaker plans to reintroduce seven bills that would increase penalties for drunk driving.

+ Read More

Play Video

MINOCQUA - The run raises money for the Kiwanis Autism Project.

The project supports six local schools by giving iPads to children with Autism.

Some of the children were presented with iPads this weekend.

"This event started with a Kiwanis governor who started an autism program, because his grandchild had autism, and he realized the power of the iPad, and how effective it could be for any kid with autism," said Race Director Dan Brunette.

+ Read More

Play Video

EAGLE RIVER - As the weather warms up, some trails in the Northwoods need to be groomed to prepare for the summer season.

+ Read More

Play Video

WISCONSIN - Bag limits for panfish could change on about 95 Wisconsin lakes. The majority of those lakes are in Northern Wisconsin.

+ Read More

WISCONSIN - The number of organ donors in Wisconsin has increased since re-launching the state's donor registry in 2010.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here