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Northwoods town receives JEM grantSubmitted: 06/20/2013
Story By Lauren Stephenson


THREE LAKES - One Northwoods town just received a large check.

The Wisconsin Department of Tourism recently gave Three Lakes more than $27,000 for its Heritage Festival.

Last year, the Three Lakes Chamber of Commerce received $30,000 for the first Heritage Festival.

Skip Brunswick, Executive Director of the Three Lakes Chamber of Commerce, says, "It's quite an honor to be considered one. I think last year we were one out of sixteen that got it and there must have been thirty-some that applied so [we're] pretty proud of it."

The money comes from the Joint Effort Marketing or "JEM" Grant program.

JEM gives out $1.1 million a year to non-profits for promoting Wisconsin tourism.

Only three other Northwoods groups have received grants from the JEM program over the last year.

Brunswick says the grant money is not just beneficial to Three Lakes.

"We like to bring attention to the entire Northwoods, just not Three Lakes. So if I do my part to bring people up to the Northwoods, they're going to be able to see some of the other areas that we have up here," he says.

This year's festival celebrates Ireland, Italy, Germany, Poland, and of course, Wisconsin.

There will be food from those countries, live entertainment, lumberjack shows and games for kids.

They expect about 2,500 people to attend.

The festival will be held on June 29th and 30th.

Related Weblinks:
Three Lakes Heritage Fest Information

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