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Northwoods Residents Compete To Lose Weight To Gain A Healthy LifestyleSubmitted: 05/13/2013
Story By Shardaa Gray


Photos By Shardaa Gray

EAGLE RIVER - The Eagle River YMCA sponsors a program called "Y-Weight" every year.

Participants have trainers to teach them about good nutrition and exercise.

They also have each other for support... and a little competition.

Sounds a lot like The Biggest Loser, except the point of this program is slow, steady weight loss that lasts.

"I got into the program because I wanted to change for me." said winner of Y-Weight Competition, Debbie Heller.

Changing for the better are these people's goals.

"I didn't like who I looked like, what was taking place," Heller said.

"So I wanted to feel happy with myself and when you're happy with yourself it kind of leaps over into every aspect of your life."

"During this past year my husband became ill and had lost a lot of weight," Y-Weight competitor, Bonnie Kegley said.

"I was very proud of him and pleased with the progress he had made and decided I needed to do something as well."

But it's not an easy task when you're first starting out.

"You have to change the eating. You have to change the exercising," said Y-Weight competitor Dave Sadenwasser.

"You have to change the portion control and you really have to change the way you think and the way you go about everything. It's a total commitment of every asset."

Even though this was a competition to see who would lose the most weight, Heller says it wasn't about winning.

"It was about doing something for us. And that was the big difference," Heller said.

"You have to change too and want to change for yourself. You can't do it for somebody else or you ultimately aren't going to succeed."

You may not be doing it for somebody else, but having somebody else's support is important.

"You're going to build your friendships. Certain people are going to click with other people and I've seen friendships being built here that I think will last a lifetime," said personal trainer, Mandy Rottier.

"It's so important to build those friendships with people that are also on that healthy lifestyle journey."

The YMCA of Eagle River runs the 10 week program once a year.

But they are looking into expanding it for the summer time.

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 IN OTHER NEWS
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 07/28/2016

- Tonight on Newswatch 12:

We look into the history of the Eagle River man who was shot and killed by officers outside of Merrill Tuesday morning after he was pulled over in Antigo, shot at a police officer and lead police into a chase that took them to Lincoln County.

We'll introduce you to the founder of the Raptor Education Group in Antigo which helps nurse injured birds back to life and returns them to the wild.

And today was "Miracle Treat Day" at Dairy Queen as the restaurant raises money for the Children's Miracle Network.

We'll bring you the details on these stories and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

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ANTIGO - When you can't catch fish, it's easy to blame the lure. If you need something different, people in Antigo make a lure that you might want to try. The Mepps assembly plant is located right off Highway 45.

Mepps fishing lures were originally made in Paris, France, starting in 1938. Back in the 1970's, a local Antigo sporting goods store owner, Todd Sheldon, decided to buy that facility and moved it to Nice, France. His son, Mike is now the president of the company.

"The guys that own the Mepps company in France were getting old enough to where they wanted to retire so we bought the Mepps company in France in 1972," said Sheldon.

One detail that makes the lure number one in the world is that they use actual animal tail fur.

"The tails are washed, dyed and tied back there," said plant worker Kim Wiegert. "And they're dehydrated. They will store a long time, so they can last 3 to 5 years."

There are many benefits to using real hair as opposed to artificial hair.

"The hair is hollow and goes through a lot of wear and tear," said Wiegert. "Other hairs would disintegrate, and fall apart. With these, it'll last longer, the fish can bite on them and it'll take a long time before they'll actually chew them apart."

Along with the hairs, there is a secret way to put the lures together that makes Mepps the best.

"We have a certain wind that we have and we can tell when we put them together, how it should be. All of our spinners are field tested before they actually go out," said Wiegert.

Even though the company distributes their product around the world, the Sheldon's still enjoy being based in Antigo.

"It's home. I grew up here and my parents grew up here and of course my kids did. And it's such a different pace of life here than the rest of the world," said Sheldon.

Everyone putting the little pieces together are women. Kim is just one who works in the plant that has been there for nearly 40 years. She also gives tours of the facility to the public.

"I like to react with the people when they come in, especially ones that have fishing stories to tell you. It's interesting here and you get to meet other people," said Wiegert.

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ALLOUEZ - A state senator says some radios didn't work at Green Bay's maximum security prison the day a corrections officer was attacked.

State Sen. Dave Hansen, D-Green Bay, is requesting an independent review of problems at the Green Bay Correctional Institution in Allouez.

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MADISON - Wisconsin's top health officials says the state's long-term care programs for the elderly and disabled will be available statewide by early 2018.

The programs Family Care and IRIS, which stands for Include, Respect I Self-Direct, are designed to keep 55,000 elderly and disabled people out of nursing homes by offering care in their own homes. Wisconsin Department of Health Services Interim Secretary Tom Engels announced Thursday the programs would expand to the final seven of Wisconsin's 72 counties.

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FLORENCE COUNTY - Driving through the Northwoods, you can see plenty of deer, cows, and horses…but bison? Those are a little rarer--unless you travel to a ranch in Florence County, where the Rock family thinks they've tapped into a special and healthy food source.

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RHINELANDER - At 51 years old, Rhinelander's Chris Moore had felt off for months. In May, it got worse. His wife, Sherri, knew something was wrong.

"'Oh, no. We're going to call an ambulance,'" Chris remembered her saying.

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WAUSAU - In less than two weeks, Wisconsin voters will head to the polls to vote in the state's primary.

That's why former Sen. Russ Feingold (D-Wisconsin) is encouraging people to vote on August 9.

He faces another Democratic Senate candidate on the ballot, Kenosha's Scott Harbach.

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