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Rhinelander's First MS Walk Submitted: 05/11/2013
Story By Shardaa Gray


Photos By Shardaa Gray

RHINELANDER - Rain sleet and a little bit of snow didn't stop people from walking outside for a good cause.

"Yes you have MS, but MS doesn't have you."

That's the motto Janet Carelstedt lives by.

She has Multiple Sclerosis.

But she doesn't let it define her and she wants other people with the disease to know that.

"Most people do go through denial. I went through denial, but then I came out of that stage and I thought, I need to help people," Carlstedt said.

"Let them know that there's organization out here that could help them."

That's exactly what she did.

This is the first walk to raise awareness for Multiple Sclerosis.

Twenty five teams participated in the walk to support people with MS.

"Just because you have MS doesn't mean you can't do anything. My sister is extremely strong, continues to be strong," MS Walk participant, Mary Vanzo said.

"It's just amazing being able to come out and give support, support her and support everyone else who has MS.

People familiar with MS see a growing need for something to be done.

"It's becoming more and more common every day," MS Walk participant Theresa Bruso said.

"You talk to more people that have it, that have been diagnosed with it and so we need to find out why."

"It's like in Rhinelander, it means a lot because it's closer for some people in the Northwoods and now people get to know what it is," said nine year old Mitchell Wolosek.

"Now people will know what it's like and how many people know what MS is in the world."

One young man wants to dedicate his life to finding a cure for his aunt.

"I think I'm going to be a scientist or a doctor and I will create a cure to beat MS." Wolosek said.

The Rhinelander chapter plans to have another walk next year in the fall.

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