Loading

29°F

31°F

32°F

29°F

29°F

31°F

32°F

33°F

29°F

30°F

33°F

32°F
Search
NEWS STORIES

Med Students Training to Return to Northwoods RootsSubmitted: 05/02/2013

Ben Meyer
Executive Producer
bmeyer@wjfw.com


MARSHFIELD - Many medical students dream of working in big hospitals or suburban private practices.

But two med students from the Northwoods are thinking the exact opposite.

"Most people are really intrigued by someone who's actually interested in staying in a small town," says one of those students, Katie Reimer, an Eagle River native.

Medical school could present a lot of options for Katie and Antigo's Jessica Novak.

They could work in a small town or big city, in Wisconsin or somewhere else, in a smaller clinic or large hospital.

But these two, currently on their clinical rotations, know exactly what they want.

"I definitely know it will be rural and I definitely know it will be north-central Wisconsin," says Jessica.

Katie and Jessica are one of the first classes of UW-Madison students in the Wisconsin Academy of Rural Medicine program at Marshfield Clinic.

"There is a shortage of physicians serving in rural areas in the state of Wisconsin, predominantly primary care, but also physician types, such as sub-specialists," says Dr. Matthew Jansen, the Director of the Division of Education at Marshfield Clinic. "The idea with WARM program is, train them locally, they'll stay locally."

Jessica heard about the program on TV, and was hooked on the idea.
"I said, that's exactly what I want to do. I want to do rural medicine," she remembers. "You just have such a great feeling of being involved, not only in the clinic but in the community as a rural physician."

Now, their long days as fourth-year med students at Marshfield Clinic will soon give way to long days as residents.

Both chose to stay with Marshfield Clinic for their residencies.

"I couldn't have asked for a better education to this point, and why mess with a good thing?" Katie asks.

Even if that is slightly different from med school classmates living - and learning - in skyscrapers.

"It's just different than them, because we're figuring out how to treat these people in rural communities," says Jessica.

Rural communities, like back home in Eagle River and Antigo - and like the communities they'll return to - as doctors.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

NORTHWOODS - 24% of people living in the Northwoods say they don't do any physical activity.

One organization is teaching employers why they should have wellness programs in the workplace.

Northwoods LEAN hosted a Wellness Seminar Tuesday to teach employees how to start or add to wellness programs at their business. Organizers say people here in the Northwoods need wellness programs to promote healthier lifestyles.

"Healthcare costs are rising," said Northwoods LEAN Worksite Wellness Committee member Dr. Wendy Henrichs. "People are getting sicker within the United States and that's translating into lost dollars in terms of productivity. So we want to give employers in the area resources to be able to incorporate wellness into their businesses."

Whether its exercise or nutrition programs, organizers see the long-term benefit of wellness programs in business.

+ Read More

RHINELANDER - Some gardeners may have gotten a jump start on their planting with last week's warm temperatures, but the return to snow and cooler temperatures the last few days could cause some concern.

Experts suggest covering plants to prevent them from freezing. However, that might not save tropical plants like Coleus.

Some annual plants like pansies, however, should be able to bounce back. Trees and shrubs should also be okay in the cooler temperatures.

+ Read More

RHINELANDER - A new survey shows 28 percent of Americans haven't really saved anything for retirement. The data also shows Americans shouldn't count on working longer into their lives to fix the issue.

+ Read More

MADISON - The Wisconsin Senate has approved a bill that would create statewide regulations on ride-hailing companies such as Uber and Lyft.


+ Read More

RHINELANDER - Oneida County won't allow a temporary dog park to be built on an empty piece of land near Rhinelander's airport.

+ Read More
Unique Boutique: Schroeder's Submitted: 04/21/2015

ANTIGO - It can be hard to find unique clothing in a smaller community like Antigo. But two sisters-in-law have perfected a business for the small town.

Schroeder's in Antigo has changed a lot over the years. The business began as a farm market.

+ Read More

MADISON - The Wisconsin Supreme Court could have a new chief justice soon, after a federal judge on Tuesday refused to block a voter-approved change in how the head of the court is selected.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here