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Trig's Smokehouse Plans to Sell Out of StateSubmitted: 05/01/2013
Story By Lex Gray


RHINELANDER - You may have already fired up your grill this spring with burgers and brats.

If those brats came from Trig's, consider yourself lucky.

The Smokehouse brats can only be bought at Trig's grocery locations and small retailers around northern Wisconsin.

But that could change soon.

Starting at the end of May, you can order Trig's brats and other meat products online.

"This will be very good for Trig's Smokehouse here. This facility was built for the future," said Gary Husnick, director of Trig's meat and smokehouse operations. "We have a 30,000 square foot facility, we haven't even tapped the potential of it yet. Right now, we are currently supplying our six stores, plus some small retail stores. So we have plenty of capacity to grow into the future.

By midsummer, shoppers in southern Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Illinois might be able to find Trig's brats in some grocery stores.

Husnick says their brats stand out partly because they're leaner than other brands.

"We found that there's a lot of demand for it, not only within northern Wisconsin here, but with a lot of our customers that come up north during the tourist season," Husnick said.

Trig's will also make private-label brats and smoked meats for stores around the Midwest.

Right now, the facility puts out between 4,000 and 6,000 pounds of brats per day.

But it can handle up to ten times that.

Trig's expects to hire ten more people by the end of summer to deal with increased production.

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