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Be on the Lookout in National ForestSubmitted: 05/01/2013
Story By Lyndsey Stemm


RHINELANDER - Campers, hikers and fishers: you need to be on the lookout. This is the time of year drug cartels scout for places to plant marijuana in the national forests.

If you're fishing or hiking on national forest land be on the look out for these things:

Pieces of land in the middle of the forest recently cleared out, garden tools or fertilizer bags, signs of digging for mass planting and roughly built structures for shelter. There are also often piles of garbage left by growers.

"These are dangerous people. They're dangerous criminals doing illegal activity. So if you do see something that is unusual your best bet is to leave the area as quickly and quietly as possible. And if you have a good idea of where you were that would be helpful to law enforcement but we don't want you to stay and linger to try and get that kind of information," says Suzanne Flory, from the U.S. Forest Service.

Three major grow sites have been found over the past few years. Each originally discovered by people passing by.

Each ranger has hundreds of thousands of acres of forest land to look after. So the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest depends on your help when something illegal is happening inside.



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