Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Be on the Lookout in National ForestSubmitted: 05/01/2013
Story By Lyndsey Stemm


RHINELANDER - Campers, hikers and fishers: you need to be on the lookout. This is the time of year drug cartels scout for places to plant marijuana in the national forests.

If you're fishing or hiking on national forest land be on the look out for these things:

Pieces of land in the middle of the forest recently cleared out, garden tools or fertilizer bags, signs of digging for mass planting and roughly built structures for shelter. There are also often piles of garbage left by growers.

"These are dangerous people. They're dangerous criminals doing illegal activity. So if you do see something that is unusual your best bet is to leave the area as quickly and quietly as possible. And if you have a good idea of where you were that would be helpful to law enforcement but we don't want you to stay and linger to try and get that kind of information," says Suzanne Flory, from the U.S. Forest Service.

Three major grow sites have been found over the past few years. Each originally discovered by people passing by.

Each ranger has hundreds of thousands of acres of forest land to look after. So the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest depends on your help when something illegal is happening inside.



Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

Play Video

EAGLE RIVER - When you think of entrepreneurs you probably think of technology startups or new inventions.

But the Vilas County Economic Development Corporation wants to focus on artists as entrepreneurs as well. 

With the latest business incubator in Eagle River, they've done just that.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - North Brown Street is now open and parking is also available. It has parallel parking spots and angled spots. Restaurants have already noticed an increase in business after the street opened late last week.

+ Read More

Play Video

ANTIGO - When the Kretz family started the Kretz Lumber Company here in Antigo in 1929, they built part of the original saw mill with hemlock that grew near the property.  Now, a piece of hemlock far older than that serves as a reminder of the company's rich history.

+ Read More

Play Video

WHITE LAKE - There's a lot of pride in the Village of White Lake.

The people there are proud of their school, proud of their health center, and proud of their history.

"There's just so much history here. It's just a good little place," said White Lake Area Historical Society secretary Judy Popelka. 

+ Read More

WAUSAU - A 43-year-old Marathon County man will go to prison for more than a decade for incest after being convicted in Marathon County court Friday.

Micheal Mayville was originally charged with multiple counts of incest and second-degree sexual assault in two separate cases. Those assault charges were ultimately dismissed.

+ Read More

Play Video

LANGLADE COUNTY - It's a long season for the carnival.

"Twenty-one weeks of summer," said A + P Enterprise manager Pauline Kedrowicz.

From May to September, A + P Enterprise, based near Stevens Point, puts on carnivals in Wisconsin. This weekend it's at the Langlade County Fair.

+ Read More

Play Video

ANTIGO - In one way, Antigo Silt Loam isn't all that special.

"The reason the Antigo Silt Loam soil was selected wasn't that it represented the whole state, or exists throughout the whole state, or that it was the most productive," said Matt Ruark, an associate professor in the Soil Science department at UW-Madison.

But in 1983, it was selected as the official Wisconsin state soil for a special reason.

"It was the most uniquely 'Wisconsin,'" Ruark said.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here