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NEWS STORIES

Budget cuts forcing Oneida County's Second Story Store into limited hoursSubmitted: 04/24/2013
Story By Lane Kimble


RHINELANDER - The Oneida County landfill offers people a unique opportunity. You pay a discounted price to get other people's mildly used furniture, tables and chairs that would otherwise end up in the trash.

But budget cuts are threatening Rhinelander's Second Story Store. Grant funding helped open Second Story in 2011. But the grant ran out this year, as did the city's 10-year solid waste contract.

Now, garbage disposal is going up $13 a ton.

That means the county has to find ways to cut back, which includes scaling back the Second Story Store.

Solid Waste Director Freeman Bennett knows the store is important to everyone, whether they use it or not.

"It not only helps people for getting a good price on good merchandise, but it saves it from dumping it into the landfill and taking up air space and burying it in the ground," Bennett said.

The cuts would mean the store goes from being open every day to just two days the entire year. But a kindly woman might be able to change that.

Bennett took a phone call out of the blue the other day asking why the Store was so limited this year.

"I explained to her, we simply don't have the money for the manpower right now and she volunteered her services," Bennett said.

It only takes one person to run the store. Bennett hopes this woman is able to come through.

Bennett says if the woman is able to help, the Second Story Store will be open daily throughout the summer.

If not, it will only be open one day around July 4th and once in the fall.

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