Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Wausau Paper to Merge with Thilmany PapersSubmitted: 04/24/2013
Story By Lex Gray

Wausau Paper to Merge with Thilmany Papers
RHINELANDER - We can file our taxes online, send emails instead of letters, and pay our bills without seeing a single piece of paper.

So it made sense that most of us worried Wausau Paper would shut down its Rhinelander and Mosinee mills.

But it now seems that probably won't be the case.

An investment firm in New York called KPS announced in late March it would buy Wausau Paper's Mosinee and Rhinelander mills.

We learned Monday KPS also plans to buy Thilmany Papers, which has mills in Kaukauna and De Pere.

KPS will form a new company made up of Thilmany and Wausau Paper's four mills.

That means the mills will probably stay open.

"This announcement is really great news, not only for Thilmany papers, but also for the entire paper industry in the state of Wisconsin," said Thilmany Papers spokesperson Addie Teeters. "This new company will form, by employee count, the largest paper company in the state, and the fact that we're going to support so many families in the state through well-paid jobs and strong papermaking historical franchises coming together, we're really excited about it."

While computers slowly shut down other parts of the paper industry, this new company won't be threatened, because it will make only specialty paper.

That includes paper for microwave popcorn bags, the medical industry, and sheets to protect steel.

"We are not at risk as some of our competitors have seen of electronic substitution," Teeter said. "We are not in the printing and writing business. Because we have such a strong market, we really feel that these businesses are going to be very strong in the future."

Wausau Paper's spokesperson Perry Grueber would not answer phone calls, but wrote in an email, "This is definitely a positive step."

The deal isn't finalized yet, but could be done as soon as June.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

Play Video

ONEIDA COUNTY -
Ruffed grouse appear to be less active this spring compared to last year.

Recent surveys showed drumming activity was down 34 percent across the state.

+ Read More
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 06/22/2018

- Tonight on Newswatch 12:


The unusual weather this spring could have an effect on how many fish you might catch this season. We talk to a local bait shop owner about the connection between the weather and the number of catchable fish that are in the water.

And we'll take you to a recycling event and tell you how you can help a local homeless shelter by bringing in old appliances.


We'll bring you the details on these stories and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

+ Read More

Play Video

EAGLE RIVER - After a long night shift, DNR Conservation Warden Supervisor Dave Walz answered his phone with some anxiety early Wednesday morning.

"Oh, phone ringing at 1, 2 in the morning, this can't be good," Walz said.

That anxiety turned to excitement.

"They said they had a homeowner with a bear in a basement," Walz said.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - This summer a Rhinelander attraction will start up in Minocqua as well. "The Key to Escape" room owners will open a second location right on Minocqua's main strip.

Owner Nick Strupp says he and the other owner wanted to find a space to offer more puzzles to more people.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - People could drop off almost anything with a plug at an electronic recycling event in Rhinelander June 22.

Computers, laptops, and TVs filled boxes in the Charter NEX Films parking lot.

+ Read More

ONEIDA COUNTY - A Lake Tomahawk man pleaded no contest to sexually assaulting a child.

Robert Aufrere was found guilty of third degree child sexual assault in Oneida County Court Friday. 

+ Read More

Play Video

- In the last week, more than a dozen people in the Wausau area found their cars damaged or broken into.

In a span of six days, at least 17 vehicles were either keyed, had windows bashed in or had stuff stolen from them.

"Some weirdo doings some weirdo stuff that's how I look at it," said Jon Radtke who lives in the neighborhood where items were stolen from a handful of unlocked cars."It's kind of (strange) for this area. We really don't have a lot of problems in the area."

Last Friday, two vehicles parked at the East High Apartments on Street and Adams Street and three more just down the street were broken into.

"We're working on who [is doing] this," said Wausau Police Officer Brian Burkhardt.

He says a few days after the break-ins around 7th Street; he received calls of 12 cars being vandalized, nothing stolen just vandalized.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 





Click Here