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NEWS STORIES

Severe Weather and Disaster Preparedness Class in RhinelanderSubmitted: 04/17/2013
Shardaa Gray
Reporter/Anchor
sgray@wjfw.com


Photos By Shardaa Gray

RHINELANDER - Even though you can't predict exactly when bad weather can turn dangerous, you can be prepared.

The School District of Rhinelander teamed up with a local entrepreneur to show you how.

They're hosting a weather readiness course at Rhinelander High School.

Greg MacMorran founded Disaster Awareness LLC with one mission, helping others.

Since it's Tornado and Severe Weather Awareness week, he focused his presentation on weather.

He wants people to realize disasters can happen any where, any time, any place.

"I don't think there's enough preparedness. I know homeland security is pushing it, Red Cross is pushing it, FEMA's pushing it," said MacMorran.

"We all need to work together as a community to be prepared."

But yesterday's attack in Boston showed us weather isn't the only threat.

MacMorran says there really isn't a way to prepare for situations like Boston, but there are ways to prevent it.

"The best way to do is be vigilant. And as homeland security always says, if you see something say something. If you see something suspicious like a bag or something like that, notify authorities right away."

He says Boston is known as a low or soft area.

What that means it's not a big city, but he wants people to know an attack could happen anywhere.

If you want to contact you MacMorran, you can reach him at 715-362-3541 or visit his Facebook page, Disaster Awareness, LLC.

Related Weblinks:
Check out Disaster Awareness LLC

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