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National Healthcare Decision Day Made Aware in Rhinelander Submitted: 04/16/2013
Story By Shardaa Gray


Photos By Shardaa Gray

RHINELANDER - Anything can happen in a split second.

Sometimes you're not able to speak for yourself when that accident occurs.

That's why one local hospital wants to make sure you're prepared.

Today is National Healthcare Decision Day.

Mayor Dick Johns made a proclamation with Ministry Saint Mary Hospital to
make awareness of advance directives.

This legally allows you to determine another person to make health care decisions in case of emergency.

"If something suddenly happens, something we're not expecting an unanticipated injury," said Community Lincoln Health Access Coordinator, Susan Sheller Kirby.

"We have an opportunity to actually communicate that information to our family and friends to actually complete an advanced directive that gives a written statement and guidance about who we want to help direct that care at a time we're not able to."

The mayor says he's been through this with his own family.

"These people have the authority within that paper to say this is what your father wanted. This is in writing. This is what he wanted," Mayor Dick Johns said.

"Boy it stops a lot of arguments in the family and a lot of the emotions that happen at that time."

You can visit Ministry Saint Mary's Hospital, Ministry Sacred Heart Hospital and Howard Young Medical Center for educational sessions.

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