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NEWS STORIES

Former Area Boston Marathoners React to BombingsSubmitted: 04/15/2013
Story By Newswatch 12 Sports


BOSTON - What most people would say is the unthinkable happened in Boston on Monday. Just as thousands of marathoners were crossing the finish line, two bombs exploded.

Three people were killed, and more than one hundred people were injured.

Those numbers could rise.

It ruins what has become an annual tradition.

Nearly 27,000 people took part in the historic race. All 50 states and 73 other countries all represented.


It's a sad time for all Americans. For former Boston Marathon runners from the Northwoods, it's even tougher.

"It's hard to comprehend something like that happening at a marathon," says Dan Lemke of Tomahawk. He ran the Boston Marathon in 2003. "It's a horrible crime, and a sad day in the history of U.S. Sports."

Blaine Nyberg of Minocqua ran the Boston Marathon the last three years. He missed this year's race because of medical issues. However the four other runners in his group were back this year.

"The first thing I did was text Matt Thomas and Dr. Rick Fossen and asked them if they were o.k.," adds Nyberg. "Both texted me back right away and said they had already finished and were a block away from the initial blast."

The other runners in the group were approximately 20-30 minutes behind those who were near the finish line. They were rerouted to another street to meet their families. The group of runners were all safe.

Police in New York City and London are stepping up security following explosions at the Boston Marathon. The London Marathon is Sunday.

Security at the White House was also beefed up after the explosions. No one was allowed to walk on Pennsylvania Avenue.

Monday night's NHL game in Boston was postponed. Tuesday
night's NBA game also in Boston was cancelled.


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