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Duffy Takes New Role in CongressSubmitted: 03/26/2013
Ben Meyer
Ben Meyer
Managing Editor / Senior Reporter
bmeyer@wjfw.com

Duffy Takes New Role in Congress
WASHINGTON - Northwoods Republican Congressman Sean Duffy thinks his rural background is perfect for his latest role in Congress.

Duffy will be the new Vice-Chairman of a subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit.

That's contained under the House Financial Services Committee.

"Being born and raised in rural America, I understand how important our small community credit unions are. They're the lifeblood of economic growth within our community," Duffy says.

Duffy's subcommittee will take a more relevant role after the 2008 financial collapse and the Dodd-Frank legislation that followed it.

"Our small community banks were not the cause of the financial crisis. But often times, they bear the brunt of the new rules and regulations that have come out. The cost of compliance, the cost of these regulations are far higher for them. So that's a focus for me," he says.

Within the Financial Services Committee, Duffy also serves on the Subcommittee on Insurance, Housing, and Community Opportunity.

Milwaukee Democrat Gwen Moore is the only other Wisconsinite on Financial Services.

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 IN OTHER NEWS
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 05/21/2018

- Tonight on Newswatch 12:

The nice weather we've been having will get some people in the mood for a bonfire or a BBQ, but the fire danger is still very high for much of the Northwoods. We talk to a local paramedic and a meat market employee about the dangers and how to stay safe while grilling.

Black bear sightings become more common in the area this time of year. We'll give you tips on how to keep those hungry bears out of your neighborhood.

And we'll show you how the city of Rhinelander is letting residents "Walk with the Mayor."

We'll bring you all this and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

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RHINELANDER - With sunny skies and warm temperatures people might want to get outside and start grilling or barbecuing.

But many counties in the Northwoods still face a very high risk for fire danger.

"It can start out as a little fire on the side of the garage and you turn away to call your dog from across the street and look back and your whole house is on fire," said Rhinelander firefighter paramedic Nicholas Heise.

Heise said the department has been busy this spring responding to more fires than usual.

"This year has been a pretty dry (season) as far as seasons go," said Heise.

That means fires will burn more rapidly and aggressively in high risk areas.

"I expect these fires to be very rapid and quickly escalate," said Heise.

Heise said some of the calls have been people grilling or barbecuing in their backyard.

"If you are grilling outside just make sure to keep a close eye on the charcoal grill," said Oneida County Deputy Sheriff Michael Baran.

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RHINELANDER - A Rhinelander organization wanted to celebrate young adults making a difference in their community. 

Forward Rhinelander announced the first-ever "Top 40 Under 40" winners last week.

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WOODRUFF - Black bear sightings become more common this time of year.

As bears come out of hibernation, they tend to be pretty hungry.

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RHINELANDER - The new "central hub" of Associated Bank in the Northwoods opened its doors Monday. 
 
Back in late-October, the bank broke ground on its new facility on the corner of Lincoln Street and Oneida Avenue. The new building brings employees from the other two buildings in downtown together. 

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WATERSMEET - With every species of insect Rachel Hovel finds, she gets a better picture of the water quality at Wildcat Falls near Watersmeet. 

"We're actually finding really good representation of the mayflies, the stone flies, caddisfly which are the three most sensitive, which is a great indication of good water quality," said Hovel. 

Hovel was one of about a dozen people that spent their Saturday searching, identifying, and cataloging all the different species of plant and animal life on the property.

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EAGLE RIVER - City water customers in Eagle River will see the effects of a brutally cold winter in 2014 four years later.

Starting this month, water bills will increase by an average of 50 percent. Cold weather in 2014 forced the city to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to repair water main freezes and breaks.

Low water bill revenues couldn't keep up.

"That winter of 2014 was probably the straw that kind of broke the camel's back that finally said, hey, you guys need to look at a rate increase," said city utility manager Pat Weber.

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