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NEWS STORIES

Mining Bill Doesn't Mean Certainty for the Industry in Wis.Submitted: 03/24/2013
Story By Associated Press

MADISON - Gov. Scott Walker signed the mining bill aimed at encouraging construction of an iron mine in northern Wisconsin. But there's still uncertainty about the future of mining in the state. And looking to neighboring states for perspective doesn't clear things up very much.

The mining industries in Minnesota and Michigan have had ups and downs over the past few years. This is due to fluctuating demand and economic uncertainty. Some mining-related jobs have disappeared, and others require a surprising level of high-tech skills.

The job outlook in Wisconsin, as well as the necessary skill set, remain to be seen. And Wisconsin mining opponents have pledged a legal fight, further complicating the picture.

One of those legal fights might soon become official. The Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa has is fundraising for a possible lawsuit. It would challenge the iron mine near the reservation.

It has set up a link on the tribe's website that allows visitors to donate directly to the tribe.

Gogebic Taconite wants to dig an open-pit mine just south of the tribe's Ashland County reservation.

Tribal members fear pollution from the mine will contaminate their water and wild rice sloughs.



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