Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

How Will Walleye Bag Limits Affect Guides?Submitted: 03/20/2013
Story By Kailey Burton


MINOCQUA - Fishing tourism puts money in many pocketbooks in the Northwoods. For those who depend on that revenue lowered walleye bag limits are a big concern.

Both the DNR and local Chippewa tribes say they want a better agreement when it comes to walleye and managing resources. Until that happens though, towns that depend on fishing tourism could take a hit.

The links between the lakes and the economy are complicated to say the least. Still for fishing guides like Russ and Jake Smith of Minocqua, the conditions of the lakes and the populations of fish have a clear economic impact.

"I can remember when all the motels were full," said Russ Smith, "And all the bait shops were very busy… restaurants. It's a snowballing effect. It affects everybody when the fish population and the bag limits are down and people go other places."

The science of caring for fisheries is much more complicated. Life would be easy if the lakes held an unlimited number of walleye. But DNR fisheries expert John Kubisiak knows those desires can't always be met.

"You can make some changes and some tweaks to it, and you can change which species is dominant in a lake, if you push hard enough, but the basic parameters, the basic ability of a lake to sustain fish populations is finite. It's not unlimited."

Kubisiak says lake ecosystems change. There are dozens of reasons why: weather patterns, temperatures, quality of vegetation, number and balance of other predatory fish, shoreline development, and the introduction of non-native species all have an affect.

Economies can change though, and the people of the Northwoods are resilient.

For guides like the Smiths, walleye aren't their only target.
"Pike, perch, crappie, musky, and small mouth bass, and sometimes we take some real little kids out for bluegill and panfish too," says Jack Smith.


Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

Play Video

ANTIGO - When the Kretz family started the Kretz Lumber Company here in Antigo in 1929, they built part of the original saw mill with hemlock that grew near the property.  Now, a piece of hemlock far older than that serves as a reminder of the company's rich history.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - North Brown Street is now open and parking is also available. It has parallel parking spots and angled spots. Restaurants have already noticed an increase in business after the street opened late last week.

+ Read More

Play Video

LANGLADE COUNTY - It's a long season for the carnival.

"Twenty-one weeks of summer," said A + P Enterprise manager Pauline Kedrowicz.

From May to September, A + P Enterprise, based near Stevens Point, puts on carnivals in Wisconsin. This weekend it's at the Langlade County Fair.

+ Read More

Play Video

ANTIGO - World-class athletes hope to etch their names into the history books during the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. But all the hard work isn't done by the athletes alone.

"I'm just going to focus on what I'm there for, and that's to do the best I can for my athletes," said Antigo native Dr. Curt Draeger.

+ Read More

Play Video

ANTIGO - In one way, Antigo Silt Loam isn't all that special.

"The reason the Antigo Silt Loam soil was selected wasn't that it represented the whole state, or exists throughout the whole state, or that it was the most productive," said Matt Ruark, an associate professor in the Soil Science department at UW-Madison.

But in 1983, it was selected as the official Wisconsin state soil for a special reason.

"It was the most uniquely 'Wisconsin,'" Ruark said.

+ Read More

WAUSAU - A 43-year-old Marathon County man will go to prison for more than a decade for incest after being convicted in Marathon County court Friday.

Micheal Mayville was originally charged with multiple counts of incest and second-degree sexual assault in two separate cases. Those assault charges were ultimately dismissed.

+ Read More

Play Video

CRANDON - Nearly 200 vendors will make their way to Crandon this weekend for the annual Kentuck Day Festival.

Among them is a former nationally ranked snow-cross racer turned peanut brittle chef.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here