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TSA Will Make Changes To Ban ListSubmitted: 03/06/2013
Story By Shardaa Gray


RHINELANDER - The TSA announced Tuesday it will allow certain items on an airplane again.

Some of the items might be reasonable,

But there's one item that has caused quite a commotion.

Getting ready to pack for a trip can be a bit of headache.

Especially if you're questioning what you should bring on board.

"For this trip we're very careful about the size of the bottle prescription that we're taking," said traveler, Ed Semon.

"So we're very much aware of the restrictions."

This week the TSA lifted some items that were on the ban list.

Most notably small knives.

Travelers at Rhinelander-Onieda County Airport were divided.

"It seems like interesting items to allow as a carry on, but I think it's good to have some kind of a little bit lightening on the restrictions," Traveler, Dustin Priebe said.

"I hope they can start going a little farther."

"I think we could use a step back," said traveler, Jeanine Semon.

"It feels good to be taken care of. It's so busy and so heavy to go through those lines."

Baseball bats, hockey sticks, lacrosse sticks and golf clubs are some of the items that are allowed back on board.

Now pocket knives that are 2.6 inches long are allowed on airplanes.

It may seem harmless to an adult, but if it gets in the wrong hands, then that's something to worry about.

"You look at the blade lengths and I think they match that off of a human being my size. What about a small child?" said Airport Director, Joe Brauer.

"So a 2.6 or such like that would be detrimental to a small child or maybe to an adult."

The T-S-A also increased security on the cockpit doors and flight attendants have taken self defense classes, but Airport Director Joe Brauer thinks the carry-on changes will cause more confusion.

"It's gonna affect all airports and there's gonna be some confusion with passengers," Brauer said.

"The general public hears that they can carry a knife on board. That's 2.6 inches and not knowing whether what they mean by lockable and what's not lockable."

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