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Gov. Walker, Sen. Baldwin reflect on post-sequester battleSubmitted: 03/05/2013

Lane Kimble
Managing Editor/Anchor
lkimble@wjfw.com


WASHINGTON, D.C. - The President promised we'd start to feel the effects of the sequester soon. But not everyone's convinced he did enough to stop them from happening.

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker was in Washington last month. He and other governors met with President Obama to give him their take on the budget crisis.

"One of the suggestions I raised to the President of the United States was that if he didn't like, and I think most of us agree, the arbitrary nature of the sequester cuts, the perfect alternative is for him to do what most governors have done over the last two years, and that is bring his cabinet in, put together a responsible list of reductions, and provide it as an alternative," Walker said.

But Democrats disgree on where spending cuts should come from.

Wisconsin Senator Tammy Baldwin thinks there are way too many tax loopholes for the rich.

"The Buffett Rule is one of them," Baldwin said. "That says the simple fact that someone who makes over $100,000,000 or $2,000,000 per year should not pay at a lower tax rate using multiple loopholes than middle class, hardworking families. Another one is just closing the loopholes, the incentives in our tax code for companies that ship jobs overseas."

Senator Baldwin also agrees the government needs to spend less money.

But she doesn't agree with the programs Republicans necessarily want to cut.

The forced sequester cuts totaled $85 billion affecting government and military programs across the nation.

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