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Driver May Have Killed Monico MooseSubmitted: 03/01/2013
Story By Ryan Michaels


- It's an event that is rare in the Northwoods and can easily happen with other animals such as deer. But not as potentially life threatening.

A driver crashed into a moose on a rural Oneida County roadway last night near Monico.

Since 2006...3 moose have been involved in car accidents in the Northwoods. The last one happened back in 2009.

Wildlife Biologist Jeremy Holtz thinks there's good evidence the moose struck last night could be the often seen Monico Moose.

He says there are only about 6 to 8 moose that frequent the Northeast part of the state.

The moose hit last night was a female weighing nearly 600-pounds. Conclusions can be drawn based on pictures and the animals tracks.

"See the size, it's a pretty good sized track, definitely bigger than a deer. They are related to deer, so this general shape is similar except that their toes kind of curve a little bit more. It's a very strong likelihood that this is what we've been calling the Monico Moose which people have been reported seeing in that same area." Holtz also says moose can cover short spans very quickly with their large size and can sometimes take a driver by surprise.

"As much as it seems obvious to us when we are not behind the wheel, when it actually happens, probably even as you see it coming or see it happening there isn't much you can do about it. My reccommendation to folks if they are put in the way where there is an animal coming, don't swerve." Holtz says steer straight and slow down.

The moose from last night's accident died. But the woman driving amazingly survived without injury.

When rare animal deaths on Wisconsin roadways happen, the animal can be sold by the DNR. The moose fetched a price tag of $262.50 to a passer-by on the road.


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