Loading

60°F

55°F

58°F

61°F

58°F

61°F

52°F

60°F

58°F
NEWS STORIES

Kilimanjaro Climb a Northwoods Team EffortSubmitted: 02/25/2013
Ben Meyer
Executive Producer
bmeyer@wjfw.com


LAC DU FLAMBEAU - Climbers usually gather at base camp.

And if the climb is Kilimanjaro, base camp means Africa.

But for one Northwoods woman, the climb started well before that - at a Lac du Flambeau school.

"It started out as sort of my dream," says Mary Poer.

"My dream" became "our dream".

Mary works for the Lac du Flambeau public school.

Climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro became a team effort - with the entire school behind her.

"When I thought of her climbing the mountain, I thought she must have been crazy," says Lilith Schuman, an eighth grader at the school.

Even so, three weeks ago, Mary made it the 19,341 feet to the summit.

The idea started while chatting with her family.

"We started comparing bucket lists for turning 50. Once I thought of Kilimanjaro, I couldn't quit thinking about it, and I decided I had better do something about it," she says.

She started training for the journey last October.

But how do you get in shape for climbing a mountain in dead-flat northern Wisconsin?

"I felt rather sheepish about it. I live near the Bearskin Trail, and I would put on my backpack, and I would put rocks in it, to be a lot heavier than what I would actually be carrying."

The way up Kilimanjaro was far from a smooth ride.

In what's called the Lunar Saddle, her group ran across a plane that had crashed in 2008.

"It was sobering to realize, okay, we're in a high altitude now, and this is serious business," says Mary.

"I was pretty confident she was going to make it. She seems like a person that wouldn't give up," Lilith says.

She didn't.

On February 7th, Mary reached the summit.

"It's bright. It's so bright up there, but lunar-like. Really lunar-like. It was like you were on the moon," remembers Mary.

She knew that thousands of miles away, the students at Lac du Flambeau were behind her for every step.

"Realizing that I had made the summit, I was actually thinking of all the kids here, because at points, I wanted to quit."

Her climb was not only a check off the bucket list for Mary, but an inspiration to grade schoolers.

"That we could make a world record or something," thinks Lilith.

And she returned to the school with a hero's welcome.

"Absolutely grand. I don't know how else to describe it. I'm blessed. I'm blessed to be amongst these young people."

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS
Shawano thinks small in economic development role in Forest CountySubmitted: 08/20/2014

Play Video

FOREST COUNTY - A new Forest County economic development leader wants to think small, instead of thinking big.

Gene Shawano Jr. just took over as President of the Forest County Economic Development Partnership.

He will help fill a void left when Executive Director Jim Schuessler and President RT Krueger each stepped down earlier this year.

Shawano wants to bring the focus back to small businesses in the county.

+ Read More
Looking for a brand new restaurant to try?Submitted: 08/20/2014

RHINELANDER - Do you find yourself looking for new places to eat out?
Well, Tula's Cafe recently added a brand new location in the Northwoods.
We found out what makes them unique, in our latest helping of 'Morning Meals with Marisa.'

Tula's recently reopened in Rhinelander. This is their second location and the manager told us so far, so good.

Tula's manager Lana Knack explains, "They said it's great to have a new restaurant choice to go to up in the Northwoods. Tula's is very successful in Minocqua, so we model everything that they do and it's worked very well."

+ Read More
ACT Exam mandatory for Wisconsin students this yearSubmitted: 08/20/2014

Play Video

EAGLE RIVER - College bound high school students in the Midwest need to take the ACT.

One Northwoods high school has seen an increase in how many students are taking the test.

About 60% of students at Northland Pines High School took the ACT last year, compared to about 53% that took it in 2010.

"We're increasing that number every year, doing our best to do that and encourage students to take this test," says Northland Pines High School Principal Jim Brewer. "It's not only just for students that are going to college, it's for anybody to take this assessment and see where they're at."

+ Read More
Wisconsin retains number 2 spot on ACT test Submitted: 08/20/2014

MADISON - Wisconsin retains its number two spot among states on the ACT college entrance exam.

The state's high school seniors scored an average composite of 22.2 out of a possible 36, ranking Wisconsin behind Minnesota. Seventy-three percent of Wisconsin seniors took the exam this year. The curriculum-based test measures students' readiness for the first year of college.

+ Read More
Concussion Awareness for High School SportsSubmitted: 08/20/2014

Play Video

RHINELANDER - Football season kicks off this Friday for many high schools across the state.

But one concern from year to year is how to prevent concussions in high school contact sports.

When sport seasons begin, so does important concussion testing. Rhinelander has two tests.

+ Read More
Man pleads not guilty of killing his wifeSubmitted: 08/20/2014

PORTAGE COUNTY - A Wisconsin Rapids man pled not guilty yesterday to killing his wife decades ago. 55-year-old Joseph Reinwand made the plea in Portage County court.

Pamela Reinwand was 19 when she died in 1984. She was shot in the head.

Police originally thought it was a suicide. but family members and fellow inmates told police they'd heard Reinwand confess to killing her.

+ Read More
Local expert offers tips on keeping shrubs and trees healthySubmitted: 08/20/2014

Play Video

NORTHWOODS - You may need help keeping your shrubs and trees in shape for the fall.

Many people were forced to buy new trees and shrubs because they didn't survive the winter. Experts at Hanson's Gardening Village told us about a few trees that are most vulnerable to the winter.

"We had some in our own nursery here that we had to dispose of this spring," said Hanson's Garden Village Co-owner Brent Hanson. "A lot of people saw this effect where you get the leafing out like you would normally expect in the spring and then all of the sudden, all the little leaves turn brown the tree seems to be dead. In the worst case scenario, the tree is dead and it seems to me from what I've seen is that maples were most affected and unfortunately, fruit trees."

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here