Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Under the Gun: The State of Gun Violence in Wis.Submitted: 02/13/2013
Story By Lyndsey Stemm


MILWAUKEE - Owning a gun is a right in America in a way that doesn't exist in any other part of the world.

It's also at the heart of a vibrant sporting culture we're very familiar with here in the Northwoods.

But other parts of the state have a more contentious relationship with guns.

Newswatch 12's Lyndsey Stemm was allowed to ride along with Milwaukee police officers. She sat down with the Chief of Police and the County Sheriff.

Up here in the North gun violence is statistically rare, but in some parts of Milwaukee, there's a battle going on between police and criminals.

"My God, there's 300 million weapons out there already," says Milwaukee Police Chief Edward Flynn.

Flynn's officers seize 2,000 of them every year from criminals.

Though Milwaukee can be portrayed as a hotbed of crime, in reality only eight percent of city territory accounts for 90 percent of its violent crime.

"There are different kinds of gun violence. And I think the tragedy in Newtown has certainly focused the attention of our citizens on one type of gun violence. And that is the low probability, high hazard event of a mass murder," says Flynn.

Milwaukee police have had to deal with two in just a few short months.

"Both Azana Spa and Sikh temple shooting put our bomb techs right on the front line," says Captain Jason Smith, Milwaukee Police Intelligence Commander.

"The other type of violence is hand gun-related, and central city-related. And it's very much the phenomenon of people who are engaged in criminal enterprises murdering each other," says Flynn.

"A lot of guns are taken in burglaries," says Timothy Keller, an officer with the Milwaukee Police Department Tactical Enforcement Unit.

It does happen. But only eight to ten percent of guns used in crimes are stolen. There are other methods criminals are using to get their hands on guns.

"If they're not stolen you can get the straw purchases. We'll see cases like that here in local gun stores," says Keller.

"What we found was a large number of women that were purchasing the guns and then they ended up in a felon's hands," says Dr. Mallory O'Brien, from the Milwaukee Homicide Review Commission.

That leaves law enforcement with the problem of how to keep criminals from getting guns, and finding the line between appropriate gun control and infringing on second amendment rights.

"The percentage of people who use firearms to commit violence, versus the overall population of gun owners... it's very small," says Milwaukee County Sheriff David Clarke.

"I think what you have to recognize, is where you stand on this issue often directly relates to where you live and your experience with firearms," says Flynn.

But people on the front lines dealing with gun violence agree it's not just a big city problem.

"Well it's not my problem. Well I guess it's not my problem if the right of an American to safety depends on their zip code, I guess It's not your problem," says Flynn.

Tomorrow we'll see how Chief Flynn and Sheriff Clarke think we should go about finding that balance between gun control and second amendment rights.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

CONOVER - Great Headwaters Trails board members know people love to walk, run, and bike on the Conover-Phelps Trail.

Now, they need help expanding that trail another five and a half miles.

+ Read More

EAGLE RIVER - Every year, a Christmas tree from Wisconsin helps brighten the Capitol rotunda in Madison. 

The Governor officially lit this years tree, which is from Eagle River, Friday.

While the trees decorations provided the light, the Northland Pines High School choir provided the sound.

"It's in the capitol and its, I mean, people from the state come to see it," said Northlands Pines sophomore Malcolm McCanles.

+ Read More
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 12/02/2016

- Tonight on Newswatch 12:

Parking bans are now in effect in at least 2 Northwoods communities. We talked to police officials about the specific details of the ban.

Right now, 3.2 miles of the Conover-Phelps trail are finished and well-used. Now a matching fund is set up to help raise money for phase 2 of the project.

And the Rhinelander Railroad Association is doing their part to get people in the Christmas spirit with a model railroad display. We'll take you to Pioneer Park where the public will be allowed to see the 1,000 square feet layout.


We'll bring you the details on these stories and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

+ Read More

EAGLE RIVER - This years Capitol Christmas tree came from Eagle River, and now the choir performing at the tree-lighting ceremony will come from Eagle River, too.

The Northland Pines High School choir got in one last practice before they head down to Madison tomorrow.

More than 30 students will be performing in front of the governor.

+ Read More

MADISON - Supporters of President-elect Donald Trump want to stop Wisconsin's ongoing presidential election recount.

A lawsuit and request for a temporary restraining order was filed late Thursday in federal court in Madison. It was filed by the Great America PAC, the Stop Hillary PAC and Wisconsin voter Ronald R. Johnson.

+ Read More

Play Video

PINE RIVER - A 73-year-old male hunter was found dead outside Merrill Wednesday evening.

The Lincoln County Sheriff's Office said they got the call around 4 p.m. that the man was missing, and they found the body just after 6 p.m.

+ Read More

STEVENS POINT - A man from Plainfield Wisconsin died in a crash Tuesday afternoon in Portage County.

The Portage County Sheriff's Office revealed Thursday morning that 59-year-old Scott Otterson was killed in the wreck.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 





Click Here