Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Making Schools SaferSubmitted: 02/04/2013
Story By Lex Gray

Making Schools Safer
MOSINEE - When you think back to Sandy Hook, you probably think of the name Adam Lanza.

He's the man who gunned down 20 children and six adults at the elementary school in December.

That tragedy has led to a tense gun control debate…and talks about how to deal with mental illness.

It's also made us talk more about school security – but Lanza didn't just walk through those front doors.

They were locked, but he easily shot through a window and got in.

When Dick Peterson of Mosinee heard that part of the story, he thought he could help.

Peterson's daughter and three granchildren live in Newtown.

"The day of the shooting, my daughter called in the morning, and she said 'Dad turn the TV on, there's something that's happened here,'" Peterson said. "It wasn't quite so bad the first day, but then she found out some of her friends lost their children and kids, when she picked them up. It was tough."

Peterson makes his living putting energy-saving film on glass windows and doors.

But he also installs bomb-blast security film.

"I've done 8 ml bomb blast film to protect people like senators, FBI officers, and big credit card companies," Peterson said.

So why not schools? Peterson decided to experiment.

He put bomb blast film on a glass frame, then fit the border with a retention system.

Bullets could still go through, but Peterson's idea is that if the glass doesn't shatter like it did at Sandy Hook, students and teachers would have enough time to evacuate or call police before an attacker broker through.

And unlike bulletproof glass, Peterson can easily retrofit current windows and glass doors with his design.

"It's just like any of the tinting that I do – it's the most efficient way of saving energy," he said. "The security film is the most efficient way of protecting yourself."

Peterson went through two rounds of tests, shooting at the glass prototype and beating it with a bat and gun.

His second prototype worked out well enough that he's ready to show it to school officials and law enforcement Wednesday.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

MILWAUKEE - A Milwaukee jury has acquitted a former police officer of first-degree reckless homicide in the shooting of a black man last year that ignited riots in the city.

Jurors on Wednesday found that Dominique Heaggan-Brown, who is also black, was justified when he shot 23-year-old Sylville Smith after a brief foot chase following a traffic stop Aug. 23. Smith had a gun when he ran, but prosecutors said Smith had thrown the weapon over a fence and was defenseless when Heaggan-Brown fired the shot that killed him.

Heaggan-Brown's attorneys argued the officer had to act quickly to defend himself. Bodycam footage showed 1.69 seconds passed between a shot that hit Smith in the arm - as he appeared to be tossing his gun - and the one that hit his chest.

+ Read More

EAGLE RIVER - People usually go to the gym to get strong or lose weight. But you normally don't see people training to drive a motorcycle.

"When a person buys a bike, they don't realize how big it is and how out of control it can be," said Dave Sixel of Sixel's Circuit Fit Eagle River.

+ Read More

MADISON - Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker is urging Republican senators to reject a Medicaid expansion he turned down but that most states accepted under the health care law passed by former President Barack Obama.

Walker said in a statement Wednesday that there are "no excuses" for Republicans in Congress not to repeal the law and not allow the Medicaid expansion to grow.

+ Read More

Play Video

ANTIGO - Shaughn Novy figured the perfect place to make a big announcement would be, literally, on her high horse.  On a brown horse, Wenesday Novy announced a significant grant to help promote a rodeo dedicated to Antigo's rich equestrian history.

Novy and her family recently opened the non-profit Black Hawk Hill Horse Park in Antigo.  It focuses on teambuilding and leadership, using horses to teach those skills.

+ Read More

EAGLE RIVER - Yoga typically means twisting and bending your body in all types of positions. But for Katie Hawke, she teaches a simpler kind of yoga - one for kids.

"Yoga is the glue that glues together your thoughts, your body and your breathing," said Hawke.

She is a teacher at MHLT in Minocqua and even uses it in her classroom.

"I've seen remarkable results," said Hawke.

Youth yoga essentially teaches children the same things it teaches adults.

"It helps teach them breathing techniques and self-calming techniques," said Hawke.

And of course with kids, they do and say the darnedest things.

"A lot of them, they like to make up their own yoga poses," said Hawke.

But Hawke mainly wants to get kids up and moving, and teach them that yoga has no boundaries.

"Yoga is something that is for every body and every age," said Hawke.

All donations from the yoga classes went to The Warehouse Art Center in Eagle River.

+ Read More

STEVENS POINT - Just shy of turning 96, Will Lehner's body doesn't quite work like it used to.

He's done a lot in his years, but on Wednesday, he did the one thing he never thought possible, he traded in his walker for some wings.

"Thank God that I'm here," Lehner said with a laugh.

The Pearl Harbor Navy Veteran climbed into a 1944 Boeing Stearman biplane--with a few helping hands--and took off over the skies of Stevens Point.

"I was anxious to keep going," said Lehner.

Lehner was able to enjoy this flight thanks to pilot Darryl Fisher.

+ Read More

NORTHWOODS - Some people turn to the internet, social media and newspapers to find a job. 

 However, the job hunt can still bring challenges. 

Some employers say it's not easy on their end either.

It is Steven Pletta's first year owning Hoggie Doggies in Woodruff. 

"I haven't had any luck with any conventional advertising, Craigslist, newspapers or the Wisconsin Job Service. None have really produced any quality applicants," said Pletta.

Pletta wants a bigger work team.

 He's not the only local employer that's been looking. Ferron Fisher faces the same problem at Steigerwaldt Tree Farm in Tomahawk.

"We usually bring on eight to 12 [people] in the summer," said Pletta. 

However, they are four people short.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 





Click Here