Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

State GOP Legislators Come to Central Wisconsin For Annual DinnerSubmitted: 02/03/2013
Story By Shardaa Gray


ROTHSCHILD - It was a packed house at the Patriot Center in Rothschild Saturday night.

The Lincoln Day Dinner kicked off with a bit of mingling, but the event was really about getting involved in your government.

"I think if more people would do it, I think our country would be better served, said Congressman Sean Duffy.

"We have so many people out here engaging in the process today. On the Republican side is excellent and it's a great way when the democrats do it too. This is government participation and to come out and see your governor, your assemblymen, your senator… yea that's fantastic."


This is the second annual dinner.

Legislatures from different counties came as one and discussed different topics.

State Representative of the 87th District Mary Williams loves everything about events like this.

"I have one of the largest districts in the state. So it's rather hard to get to everybody when we do doors, you know to get to everybody," Williams said.

"But in an event like this just think of all the people that you can meet inside your district and outside your district."

The main message Governor Scott Walker wanted the people take away is that Republican needs to reconstruct the bases of their party.

"Their dream is that someday that through their hard work and determination they'll live their own life and pursue their own jobs and start their own company, to make their kids get an education that allows them to do a better job than they did," said Governor Walker.

"That's the message we need to take because that's a relevant message in every one of those groups I mentioned, every other person in this state and in this country. That's the message that republicans need to deliver because that's the bases of our party."

The event included speeches from state senators, state reps and of course, good old fashioned campaigning.

"There's a primary election February 19th and I'd like all of the voters out there to remember to go to the polls and to vote for Pat Roggensack." said Supreme Court Justice Pat Roggensack.

"This is probably the biggest audience I've talked in front of, especially this race," said Representative Don Pridemore.

"So it allows more efficiency in terms of campaigning strategy. That's why I'm so glad to be here and glad I was invited."

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

MINOCQUA - A Green Bay man died in a snowmobile crash in Minocqua Tuesday night.

The Minocqua Police Department says the crash happened at 7:13 p.m. on Lower Kaubashine Road near the intersection of Camp Nine Road and Cedar Falls Drive.

+ Read More

Play Video

TOMAHAWK - Fishermen who like the Grandmother Flowage near Tomahawk needed to find a new place to fish this past fall.

The Packaging Corporation of America lowered the water level 14 feet to repair the dam there.

PCA owns the dam that controls the flowage.

The DNR recommended emptying the flowage a quarter inch per hour, which comes to about six inches per day.

+ Read More

Play Video

EAGLE RIVER - Take salvaged metal and wood, hand it to one Eagle River artist, and watch his imagination come to life.

+ Read More

SIOUX FALLS, SOUTH DAKOTA - Two children taken from Antigo could be in South Dakota. The kids are thought to be with their non-custodial mother in the Black Hills area.

+ Read More

RHINELANDER - Many Northwoods hunters think the DNR's baiting and feeding ban doesn't work as intended. Some actually think it's hurting the deer herd.

At the beginning of 2016, the DNR banned baiting and feeding in Oneida, Vilas, and Forest counties.

That's because a deer was found with chronic wasting disease in Three Lakes. Now, hunters and the DNR want to find a way to stop the spread.

+ Read More

MOLE LAKE - When you drive through Mole Lake, you'll notice a lot of solar panels.

It's part of a project tribal leaders have worked on for more than a year, and they hope it will save the community a lot in energy costs.

Tribal leaders applied and received a couple million dollars in grants from the U.S. Energy Department and the Housing and Urban Development Department. Then they started working with a Pewaukee-based company called SunVest Solar, Inc., and started installing the panels on homes and businesses in 
September.

Now, they are almost done.

According to SunVest Solar, this is the largest per capital solar array installation in the Midwest. Tribal Administrator Jeff Ackley, Jr., says 50 homes and 17 businesses have solar panels.

"Most of the state of Wisconsin has less than one percent of its generation coming from solar and now you have a community where almost 50 percent of the homes get their power from the sun," said Adam Gusse, head of operations at SunVest Solar, Inc.

"I thought it would put us on the map," Ackley said.

Project leaders think the panels can produce up to 85 percent of power in homes and between 20 and 60 percent for businesses.

"It will be significant savings all around for the community," Ackley said. "From rough crunchings of numbers we're looking at probably saving between $60,000 and $80,000 per year on energy usage."

The first batch of panels turned on in November, and some people say they've already seen the savings.

"Some are seeing up to $100 in savings just after that first month," Gusse said. "So they'll see much more per month savings as they go on."

Gusse said the panels don't produce as much power in the winter as they will in the summer, but residents still save money.

Tribal leaders can apply for more grants to put panels on more homes. 

+ Read More

Play Video

EAGLE RIVER - Patti Underhill spends her days crafting.

"Basically I like to sew," she said. "When I was young, I made my own Barbie doll clothes and my mom showed me how to sew."

It's a hobby that--now in her retirement--is paying off for Underhill in small ways. She is one of 29 vendors who volunteers her time to work in the Eagle River Serve Senior Craft Shop. Vendors keep 70 percent of the profits, and the other 30 percent goes back to the shop or includes sales tax.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 





Click Here