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American Legion Uses Meat Raffle to Support War VeteransSubmitted: 01/27/2013
Story By Ryan Abney

American Legion Uses Meat Raffle to Support War Veterans
LAKE TOMAHAWK - Today, Lake Tomahawk's American Legion put on the Gunless Poultry Shoot. It gave some people a chance bag a bird without ever unloading a weapon.

It was the first of five poultry shoot events this year and all of them to benefit local veterans. For a few hours, the Shamrock bar became a makeshift butcher shop. Locally produced meat was dished out to people with winning tickets.

Gary Madden is Legion-318's Post Commander.
And with prizes like these, he wasn't surprised with the strong turnout.


"As you can see it draws a pretty good crowd. It gives people something to do on a snowy Sunday afternoon. It's just a way of raising money. Everyone enjoys it. They buy a ticket for 50-cents to win a pack of meat."

Adrian Prichard is also a member of Lake Tomahawk's Legion. He worked up a sweat passing out prize packs all afternoon. He said being with his community makes it worth while.

"Coming out and meeting all the people. Everybody participates, They pick on all the winners. It's just a good time."

If you missed this drawing, you're in luck. The Legion hosts another Gunless Poultry Shoot next Sunday at Cricket's bar in Saint Amery.

The raffle starts at 1 p.m.


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