Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Students build energy star home to bring down utility billsSubmitted: 06/07/2014
Story By Karolina Buczek


RHINELANDER - Attention to small details will help two families save some money on their utility bills. Rhinelander High School students in the Building Trades Program built an energy star duplex.

"There are about ten percent of homes north of Highway 29 that can say they have that label," said building instructor, Russ Germain. "I think it only makes sense if we're in the education business to educate possible future builders and homeowners."

An energy star home has most of its small cracks sealed up tightly to stop heat from escaping.

"In a normal energy star house, there's 500 CFM units of leakage. In our house, there's only 240 and 220 so we're 45 percent better than a normal energy star house," said Rhinelander High School senior Logan Rudis.

The program uses more expensive products to make sure the house conserves energy.

"We use different products," said Germain. "We spend more money on things that will essentially make the house tighter while providing good ventilation so it's a healthy home as well."

Getting the energy star certification wasn't easy. The students had to build the entire house differently than normal.

"We frame differently. We insulate differently. When it comes to air sealing, we try to do a really good job of eliminating leaks," said Germain.

The students used a unique framing technique.

"We wanted to try to frame so that it's a good, strong, safe home but we're not wasting a lot of material. We're actually adding more insulation to our walls so ultimately the customer is going to benefit," said Germain.

The duplex is finally done and will be available for rent sometime in July.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

COLUMBUS, OH - Former astronaut and U.S. Sen. John Glenn has died in Ohio. He was 95.

Glenn became a national hero in 1962 when he became the first American to orbit the Earth.

Hank Wilson with the John Glenn School of Public Affairs says Glenn died Thursday afternoon at the James Cancer Hospital in Columbus.

+ Read More

Play Video

WAUSAU - Wausau police officers believe they're pretty good at caching criminals. But they say they're not so good at helping victims suffering from mental trauma. 

To try to fix that, the Wausau Police Department will hire a mental health therapist to serve in the Victim Resource unit. 

+ Read More

Play Video

LINCOLN COUNTY - We can add one more northern Wisconsin county to the list of those who finished the recount.

Lincoln County finished up Wednesday afternoon, and it didn't see much change.

Lincoln County Clerk Chris Marlowe said the totals fluctuated a bit within each town, but county-wide each presidential candidate gained onevote.

Marlowe said although it was tedious,he learned a lot.

"You know when we do our training and discuss all these things it's always, we always reference the possibility of a count, a recount," Marlowe said. "And it's one thing referencing a recount and it's another thing actually doing the recount."

Lincoln County re-counted all the votes by hand. There were 16 volunteers, and they went through close to 15,000 votes.

The statewide recount cost Jill Stein about $3.5 million.

"You know, at the end of the day was it worth the money, I don't think so, but you know, we gained experience," Marlowe said.

The deadline to finish the recount is Dec. 12. 

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - We often bring you stories of efforts to fight aquatic invasive species in the Northwoods during the summer. It's tempting to think that invasives don't pose a problem during the winter.

But conservation workers want you to rethink that idea. Species like Eurasian watermilfoil don't simply wither underwater in the winter.

"Eurasian watermilfoil is considered a perennial. However, I consider it an evergreen. A lot of people do," said Oneida County AIS Coordinator Stephanie Boismenue. "The reason being is it's winter-hardy. It's capable to live and grow underneath the ice."

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - Twenty-two-year-old Tessa Szmania wanted to work full-time as graphic designer. She also wanted to live in Rhinelander.

It turns out she couldn't have both.

Szmania got an associate's degree in graphic design from Nicolet College in Rhinelander in 2013. Then, things got tough.

+ Read More

Play Video

LAONA - For the first time in his life, Melvin Casiano got to walk across a graduation stage.

"I feel nervous at the same time, but proud that I made it this far," said 19-year-old Casiano.

Casiano is one of 16 students that graduated from Blackwell Job Corps' first structural firefighting course.

It's an accomplishment that he never thought was possible.

+ Read More

LANSING, MI - Michigan lawmakers may re-enact a wolf-hunting law declared unconstitutional by the state appeals court.

The Republican-led Senate voted 27-10 along party lines Thursday to define wolves as a game species and to authorize the state to designate game. The bill goes to the House.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 





Click Here