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Getting messy for a causeSubmitted: 05/03/2014

Karolina Buczek
Reporter/Anchor
kbuczek@wjfw.com


CRANDON - Bright colors bursting through the air can attract a large crowd.

The Colors of Cancer 5K run in Crandon gave people a chance to get messy for a cause.

The runners were splattered with different colored powders throughout the run.

"Each color station represents a different ribbon. We had the yellow representing childhood cancer, the pink for breast, the blue for prostate and colon, orange for leukemia. Then we end with purple which represents all the different cancers," said Kadie Montgomery, a member of the Forest County Ties That Bind Us.

The Ties That Bind Us of Forest County hosted the run.

The money raised will help cancer patients pay for gas so they can get to their treatment.

Event organizers believe many people with cancer can't afford paying for gas to get to the hospitals.

"Especially when the travel is 30 minutes, 45 minutes, and some people are driving all the way to Wausau depending on their treatment. Some people have to go every day so we wanted something that was going to help them get to treatment," said Montgomery.

The group will help anyone who has cancer in Forest County.

"Currently, anyone in Forest County that is undergoing treatment qualifies for this. It doesn't matter about your income or anything," said Montgomery.

More than 500 people ran in the color run.

Event organizers wanted to make the run something everyone could participate in.

"We really wanted something all kids could participate in. One of goals through the ties that bind us is to incorporate health and wellness to the community. We wanted a fun event that kids were going to enjoy, just get out and enjoy the day," said Montgomery.


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 IN OTHER NEWS
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 09/29/2016

- Tonight on Newswatch 12:

Merrill leaders decided not to discipline City Administrator Dave Johnson and Fire Chief Dave Savone for taking items from the Lincoln County Fairgrounds that some people considered historic and valuable. Merrill Mayor Bill Bealecki issued a statement to the media saying that although Johnson and Savone didn't violate city policy, their actions were in poor judgment. We'll hear from Johnson on what he thinks about the statement.

The Northwoods area has seen several cases of deer poaching in the last week, and most of them were not caught. But authorities recently caught two teenagers in the act thanks to neighbors in the Lakeland area. You'll hear from the Conservation Ward Supervisor on how they were caught.

And, we'll tell you about a local company that is transferring ownership to all of the employees.

We'll bring you the details on these stories and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

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ONEIDA COUNTY - No matter the weather, a glass of wine can be enjoyed year round. Even in the bitter cold, there are wineries in Oneida County that still offer tastings and wine tours.

"When people think of a winery, they do think of grape wines. They're kind of surprised, pleasantly surprised when they come to our winery and see fruit wines," said Terri Schenck from Three Lakes Winery.

The Oneida County wineries are a little bit different than what you'd see in Napa Valley.

"It is a farm so we are working on different crops, black currants, apples and an experimental vineyard," said Linda Welbes from Brigadoon Winery in Tripoli.

With the unique flavors of wines, Three Lakes Winery and Brigadoon Winery often see a lot of visitors from out of town.

"They usually say, 'I didn't know how much I needed this.' They relax, they unwind whether it's summer time or fall, just to sit outdoors when it's beautiful, it's peaceful, it's quiet," said Welbes.

Three Lakes Winery has a lot of history behind their building. 

"The actual winery itself is an old Chicago Northwestern Train Depot that was built in 1880. There was a tornado or wind storm that happened in 1924 that destroyed the building," said Schenck.

The building was rebuilt shortly after. Every fall the winery hosts cranberry marsh tours.

"There are several bogs in the area and it's interesting for people to be able to go and see a bog and see how the cranberries are harvested and what goes into making cranberry wine," said Schenck.

With winter right around the corner, the crops won't be producing much.

"The crops, they are what they are. It's farming so there's not much you have to do and you just hope for good weather. Lots of snow cover, that helps," said Welbes.

The Three Eagle Trail runs right into the parking lot of Three Lakes Winery. That brings in a lot of traffic year-round.

"In the winter time it turns into the snowmobile trail. We will get a lot of snowmobile traffic in the winter time and a lot of foot traffic, hiking, biking people in the summer time," said Schenck.

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MINOCQUA - You can see the leaves just beginning to turn here, but soon the Northwoods will be a whirlwind of oranges, reds, and yellows. 

"Not only is the environment around us changing, but just kind of the pace of life in the Northwoods starts to change a little," said Northwoods Zip Line General Manager Andrew Warner.

Many people enjoy hiking or taking a scenic drive to view the fall colors, but Northwoods Zip Line in Minocqua offers people a different perspective.

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TOMAH - Wisconsin cranberry growers are expecting an above-average crop yield this year because of nearly ideal growing conditions.

Ed Grygleski is president of Valley Corp., a cranberry producer near Tomah in west central Wisconsin. He tells the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel that it has been a great year for growing because there has been plenty of sun without extreme heat.

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MADISON - The state Assembly's Republican and Democrat leaders are quarreling over how to fund Wisconsin's roads.

Gov. Scott Walker has proposed delaying projects and borrowing rather than raise the gas tax and vehicle registration fees. Assembly Speaker Robin Vos has balked at that, saying it's not a long-term solution.

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MINNEAPOLIS - A Minnesota man says his family has been given little information on how his two sisters died while vacationing on a tropical African island.

The bodies of 37-year-old Annie Korkki and 42-year-old Robin Korkki were found in their resort villa last week in Seychelles, an archipelago nation off Africa's east coast in the Indian Ocean.

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FLORENCE - In Florence County, more people work in forestry-related jobs than in any other industry.

"It's unbelievable, the way I put it," said logger Jaden Streu. "There are a lot, a lot of jobs and a lot of people that are retiring."

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