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Impacts of soda on health and taxesSubmitted: 03/27/2014
Story By Matt Brooks

Impacts of soda on health and taxes
RHINELANDER - Most of you know that there are few health benefits in soda.

That's why some cities have taxed or restricted the size of soft drinks.

A new UW-Madison study says that might not lead to weight loss.

Turning down the soft drink will save you calories, but it all depends on your eating habits.

"It's basically the sugars, you know," said Nutritional Counselor and Chiropractic Doctor Earl Roth. "A soft drink in the 1950s was 6.5 ounces and today you can get a 64 ounce soda and there's so much sugar and calories that it's almost equal to 700 calories in some types of soft drinks."

Some people feel if they give up soda, they can eat more.

This can actually lead to higher daily calorie intake.

"If you reduce calories in one part of your diet and replace those calories somewhere else in your diet, there's going to be no net change," said Roth. "So you are not going to have a change in your diet, but if you take a 700 calorie and 64 ounce soft drink beverage and replace that with water, you're going to have a dramatic change."

Though turning down soda is considered to be healthier, it won't lead to weight loss if you replace it with other calories in your diet.



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