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A boost for honey beesSubmitted: 02/26/2014
A boost for honey bees
Story By Matt Brooks

MIDWEST - The USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service will make a nearly 3 million dollar investment in Midwestern farmers.

The goal is to improve honey bee health in order to protect American crop production.

According to the USDA, beekeepers have lost nearly 30 percent of their honey bee colonies per year since 2006.

Bee pollination plays an important role in crop production and helps to produce over 130 different types of fruits and vegetables.

Pollination from honey bees helps to support nearly 15 billion dollars worth of agricultural crops.

This investment targets farmers in Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

It will help to provide a better environment for honey bees by providing them safe food, a more secure habitat, and fewer harmful invasive species.

Applications to receive funding are due by March 21st.




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