Loading

51°F

51°F

49°F

52°F

49°F

52°F

49°F

55°F

49°F

49°F

55°F

49°F
Search
NEWS STORIES

Northwoods Spotlight - High school bowling Feb 19Submitted: 02/19/2014

Ben Meyer
Executive Producer
bmeyer@wjfw.com


STEVENS POINT - Popular sports like football and basketball generally get the biggest crowds. They also get a lot of attention on the high school level.

But some Northwoods teams believe they're just as worthy. Newswatch 12's Ben Meyer hits the lanes with more.

NAT: 1,2,3 Yeah!

NAT: bowl

The competitors might be a little different than traditional prep athletes.
But walking into a packed alley might convince you high school bowling is absolutely legitimate.



"I think they would be amazed," Rhinelander bowling coach Mike Boarcier explains. "A lot of people don't understand this is a sport. They don't think it is a sport, but it is."

While it's not yet sanctioned by the WIAA, prep bowling is made attractive by the variety of bowlers – different ages, different genders, different skill levels, all on the same team.

"It's very diverse," Boarcier adds. "You don't have to be a top athlete…any shape, size, height, shortness, whatever, you can do this sport."

Comparing being on a bowling team to sports like football, softball, or basketball … depends on who you ask.

Tommy Strauss is a member of Rhinelander bowling team.

"It's completely different," Strauss said. "You really can't compare it. It's really more mental than it is physical."

Merrill bowler Zach Campbell adds, "I try to think of us, we're the same. I get crap a lot at school that says, it's not a real sport. But we do as much as they do like on a football team."

One difference is for sure, instead of a cutthroat competition mentality, bowlers can celebrate with their teammates, as well as opponents.

"The group dynamic of the whole thing intrigues me all of the time," Campbell explains. "I love it."

"What I like to do is I like to make sure everyone has fun," Strauss said. "You know, run around, and have everyone get involved. If you get too tense, you start thinking about it, and start messing up. If you just stay calm and start having fun, you'll do better."

The state bowling championships are in two weeks in Green Bay.

"We don't really get a lot of hype about this sport," Campbell said. "But we like it. There's really nothing else to it."


Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

MADISON - Wisconsin lawmakers have rejected Republican Gov. Scott Walker's plan to block the state Department of Natural Resources from purchasing any land through its stewardship program for at least the next 13 years.

+ Read More

MADISON - The Legislature's budget-writing committee plans to reduce Gov. Scott Walker's proposed $300 million cut to the University of Wisconsin System by $50 million.

+ Read More

Play Video

ARMSTRONG CREEK - Liz Wywialowski gets a certain feeling when she comes back to her old family farm near Armstrong Creek.

"You would see me breathing deeply," she says, drawing in a lungful of oxygen. "Even now, there's nothing like clean, fresh air."

Liz grew up on this farm, and now owns the place, though she lives in southern Wisconsin. Her father built the majestic cedar-sided barn with her brothers, finishing it in 1944.

"He built this barn as if it would be the last barn he would need to build," Liz says.

+ Read More

MADISON - The Legislature's finance committee has adopted Republican Gov. Scott Walker's plan to eliminate 80 positions within the state Department of Natural Resources, including more than half of the researchers in the agency's science bureau.

+ Read More

THREE LAKES - The 57 year old wrestling coach, Joseph Fitzpatrick is charged with sexual assault of a minor and delivering drugs to several students.

He's accused of giving students drugs at school and at his home.

That's after one student, caught with marijuana, said she got it from Fitzpatrick.

That 14 year old student also said Fitzpatrick had sex with her.

+ Read More

WHITE LAKE - Students in White Lake spent the day outside of the classroom learning about invasive species today. It was the 16th annual Spring Lake Day at White Lake. It's part of the year-round Adopt-A-Lake program that teaches students about waterway and environmental preservation.

"Being on White Lake and being in the Northwoods, aquatic invasive species education is extremely important," said Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator John Preuss. "And a good way to reach out to people is through our students and through our youth."

Elementary students from White Lake School learned about the different aquatic invasive species such as purple loosestrife, and Eurasian watermilfoil. They also learned how to prevent them from spreading.

"Those plants spread by fragmentation and boat traffic," said Preuss. "And just educating people so they know the right steps to take and the laws to prevent this plant from moving around. We have 15,000 lakes in Wisconsin; just a small percentage have an invasive species."

Students also learned about the spread of a tree killing bug called emerald ash bore.

+ Read More

THREE LAKES - Eleven campgrounds in the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest closed this year after the U.S. Forest Service reduced its funding and services.

The cuts happened because fewer people have been visiting the campgrounds in the last few years, but the Three Lakes Town Board will pay to keep one of its grounds open for the 2015 season.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here