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Phosphorus rules may be delayedSubmitted: 02/18/2014
Story By Associated Press

MADISON - New rules meant to reduce phosphorus pollution in lakes may be delayed.

Too much phosphorus in lakes can cause excess algae growth.

The Wisconsin state Senate plans to vote on pushing back the costly phosphorus reduction rules.

The Republican-sponsored proposal is up for a vote today.

The bill also gives communities and the industry more options and time for reducing the pollutant which causes algae.

Treatment plant operators and business groups have been lobbying for changes.

They think the current regulations are too expensive and difficult to meet.

They also question if they will work as hoped to cut down on algae growth in public waters.

The state approved phosphorus regulation in late 2010, under then-Governor Jim Doyle.

Current Governor Scott Walker and Republicans have been looking at scaling them back.

(Copyright 2014 Associated Press - All Rights Reserved)


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