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England will serve year in jail for feloniesSubmitted: 02/10/2014
Ben Meyer
Ben Meyer
Managing Editor / Senior Reporter
bmeyer@wjfw.com

England will serve year in jail for felonies
RHINELANDER - A district attorney called Traci England's actions enraging and repugnant in
court on Monday.

A judge called them repulsive.

"It was the most difficult time of my life to lose a child," Wally Olejnik told
the court.

Olejnik lost a son.

"Who are you? Do you even know yourself? I know you, Traci. I know who you
are. I know what kind of person you are," Brittany Deleeuw said.

Deleeuw lost a family member.

These two had family members who became victims of England, the former Oneida
and Forest County Medical Examiner, after their deaths.

"Most people recognize that this type of conduct is repulsive," Forest County
Judge Leon Stenz told England.

Without their family's permission, England stole body parts of four people to
train her dog as a cadaver dog.

After pleading guilty to two felonies, England was punished with a year in jail
at Monday's sentencing.

"Whereas these families could have gotten over the untimely death of a loved
one, it is likely they will never get over the consequences of this act," Stenz
said.

"As parents who are charged with the care of children, (my wife) Kathy and I are
daily haunted by our decision to entrust (our son) David's remains to Traci
England," Olejnik said.

"It hurts my very soul that even after death, I was unable to protect (our
family member) from being cheated out of and stolen from," Laura Deleeuw said.

"My intent was to help law enforcement. My actions have affected me
tremendously, as well as my family, my profession, and the people I work with,"
England told the court in a 34-second statement.

Entering sentencing, prosecutors and defense attorneys had agreed to recommend a
ten-day jail sentence to Stenz.

"I feel it's woefully inadequate," Stenz said upon review.

Stenz imposed the year in jail as a part a three-year term of probation.

"To see the judge go over what was jointly proposed was not a surprise at all.
I think it was warranted," Forest County District Attorney Chuck Simono said
after the sentencing.

Unless there's an appeal, Monday's decision closes a criminal case that has
dragged out for more than two years.

England will need to report to jail by Friday.

For the families of the victims, the sentence might provide some sense of closure.

"She offered peace of mind, but these were just lies that Traci England said.
By now, you know the horrible truth, your honor," Olejnik told Stenz during the
hearing.

England's attorney still has the option of appealing the sentence.

He declined our invitation for an interview on Monday.

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