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NEWS STORIES

Mitten tree brings warmth to Merrill community for 32nd yearSubmitted: 12/18/2013

Ben Meyer
Executive Producer
bmeyer@wjfw.com


MERRILL - You could call Sandy Hull a committed woman.

For 32 years, the Merrill woman has helped keep kids warm with hats, mittens, and scarves.

Again this year, she's in charge of the mitten tree at Miller Home Furnishings in Merrill.

People donate things to keep kids warm.

Hull brings them to schools in Merrill, who distribute them to kids who need them.

"It's gone up to at least 500 pairs of mittens every year. The tree behind you was just cleaned off two days ago. Completely cleaned off two days ago, and was taken to the kids at the schools. Now, it's completely full again," Sandy says.

Hull is grateful for the caring Merrill community.

It helps make the mitten tree a success every year.

"I'm so heartfelt that they would do this for our little children, do this for them year after year. It just tickles my heart. I'm just so fortunate to be able to do this," she says.

The mitten tree has partnered with Miller's for each of its 32 years.

Hull encourages your donations at the store in Merrill through Christmas.

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