Loading

78°F

76°F

75°F

75°F

76°F

75°F

78°F

75°F

75°F

78°F

75°F

78°F
Search
NEWS STORIES

Conservationist wardens care about your safety Submitted: 11/30/2013
Story By Kalia Baker


RHINELANDER - Conservationist wardens help keep you safe while hunting or ice fishing.

"Most of what we do, and most of the rules that we regulate, are surrounded by safety rules," says James Yung, conservationist warden for the Department of Natural Resources.

Safety may not be what you'd think wardens are solely focused on, but for James Yung it is.

Yung has met hunters unwilling to follow the rules, but hunters like Michael Baran, think wardens and the rules they enforce are necessary.

"Wardens aren't as bad as most people think. I mean, they're doing their job, so we appreciate it," says Baran.

Baran has been hunting for most of his life. His family had hunted at the same camp for three generations.

They've always believed wardens help protect the hunting tradition.

"It's very important. We do our part to make sure that we're not breaking any laws. And if we see other people that are, that's what wardens are there for," says Baran. "We'll send in a tip if something doesn't seem right to us, but it's very important to us to keep everyone able to hunt."

Wardens don't just stick to the woods to make sure people are following the rules. They also patrol the lakes to ensure ice fisherman are following safety rules.

Warden Yung believes people who aren't following the rules don't know the rules. He encourages everyone hunting or fishing to educate themselves.

"It doesn't pay to take a risk, to maybe harvest a fish, or harvest a deer, that could potentially be a danger to somebody else," says Yung.

The rules are what prevents those risks. People who want to see changes in the rules, can make them.

"They have opportunities to come to our public hearings to have input. The rules are really rules that aren't just made up in Madison. The public does have a role in those rules," says Yung.



Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

SUPERIOR - Investigators think they know why two skydiving planes crashed mid-air near Superior two years ago.

They blame a lack of guidance from the Federal Aviation Administration and improper training.

The crash happened in November 2013.

All nine skydivers on the two planes and one pilot jumped to safety.

The other pilot landed the damaged plane.

The National Transportation Safety Board says the FAA doesn't have many rules on how pilots should fly formation flights with skydivers.

Because of that, the owner of the skydiving company did not give its pilots training.

Footage from helmet cameras shows one plane coming down on the back of another, damaging the lead plane's right wing.

(Copyright 2015 Associated Press - All Rights Reserved)

+ Read More

GREEN BAY - Lambeau field should be safe from being renamed to make money.

The president of the Green Bay Packers doesn't want to sell the naming rights to Lambeau Field.

Mark Murphy says it doesn't make sense to put a corporate tag on the name of the historic stadium.

Murphy talked to shareholders at the franchise's annual meeting on Tuesday at Lambeau.

Stadium naming rights have become a way for professional sports teams to make a lot of money.

The Packers are not hurting for cash.

They made $375-million in revenue in 2015.

(Copyright 2015 Associated Press - All Rights Reserved)

+ Read More

OCONTO - A tree from northeast Wisconsin will take center stage at the White House for the 2016 holiday season.

Whispering Pines Tree Farm in Oconto says it has won the National Christmas Tree Association's competition.

That means a tree from Whispering Pines will be on display in the Blue Room of the White House next year.

White House staff members get final say on which tree is selected.

The National Christmas Tree Association has presented the official White House Christmas tree since 1966.


+ Read More
RC group to keep track openSubmitted: 07/29/2015

CRANDON -

Team No Limit Racing will run a new track behind the former RC Havok building in Crandon. RC Havok was an RC car rental store and track that provided kids and families affordable racing. No Limit Racing wants to make sure kids can continue to race without breaking the bank.

"The biggest goal of this track is to give kids that don't have anything something to do," explained Track Manager Steve Sadnick, Jr. "Something they can play on, and something to keep them out of trouble. "I wish I had something like this when I was a kid."


+ Read More

Play Video

PEARSON - People from Wisconsin camp all the time, but it's not every day a group of British Boy Scouts comes to camp in the Northwoods for a week. 

"As a group, we've never been to the United States of America before, " said Troop Leader Stephen Bell.

Bell can cross that off his list. He's one of 11 British Boy Scouts and leaders staying at Camp Ma-Ka-Ja-Wan this week.

"We were looking for somewhere to extend the stay, so after a Google search, this site appeared to be the best one in the local area, so we headed up here for the rest of our time in the US," said Bell.

The 1st Carlton Colville Air Scouts come from the eastern coast of England in Lowestoft, about three and a half hours from London.

After spending time at the EAA event in Oshkosh, the troop came to Pearson for the week. It cost more than $30,000 and two years to make the trip happen. 

"I'm certainly not disappointed having arrived," said Bell.

Now that they're here, scouts say there are many differences from home. 

+ Read More

Play Video

NORTHWOODS - Heartworm can be deadly for a dog if left untreated.

Some veterinarians here in the Northwoods have seen a rise in dogs with heartworm lately.

+ Read More

Play Video

MADISON - Gov. Scott Walker says the bill passed by the Wisconsin State Assembly committing $250 million in taxpayer money toward paying for a new Milwaukee Bucks arena is a "good deal all the way around."

Walker made his comments Tuesday while speaking with reporters in Philadelphia.

Walker says he is ready to sign the bill, which passed on a bipartisan 52-34 vote. There were 35 Republicans and 17 Democrats in support, with 20 Republicans and 14 Democrats against.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here