Man survives typhoon, now trying to help fiance and future familySubmitted: 11/22/2013

Adam Fox
10 p.m. Anchor/Reporter

TOMAHAWK - Tim Iding went to the Philippines expecting to spend time with his fiance Loneta's family, and do some diving. Instead he found tragedy.

Iding, who prefers to go by Shortcut, hadn't been to the Philippines since his final days during the Vietnam War. He was a diver for a salvaging boat during the war.

He decided to visit his fiance's family in the Philippines when Typhoon Yolanda hit.

"You hear tornadoes where people say it sounds like a train," Shortcut said. "It didn't sound like that, but the wind you could hear."

They had a 72-hour warning before the typhoon hit. They stayed in a sturdy, cement room during the storm. Shortcut said the back of the building took the brunt of the storm. Winds reached nearly 230 miles per hour

"Everything was getting kinda blown from the mountains over the top of me and towards the ocean," Shortcut said.

Shortcut and his fiance Loneta, who goes by Loni, made it through the storm untouched. They found out a few days later that her entire family made it too.

But people around them weren't so lucky.

"These people the next morning, still everybody is in shock," Shortcut said. "You've got families sitting around, with their house gone."

According to the government, the death toll has passed 5,200 people. Filipinos look to their government and aid organizations for help. They're getting food and water in the hardest hit cities like Tacloban. But Shortcut worries about remote areas, like where his fiance's family lives.

"But to try to get these people relief efforts, to these small villages and up into the mountain," Shortcut said. "I don't know how something like that is going to get done."

He used all of his vacation and diving money to buy people food and supplies. But then he had to come home.

"I had to come back," Shortcut said. "If I'd of had more money I would of stayed there and I wouldn't be back here right now."

Even through all of the turmoil from the typhoon, Shortcut says the scariest part of the adventure was the ferry he had to take to get to his plane. He couldn't go to the Tacloban Airport because it had been hit hard by a storm surge.

So he had to take a ferry on a 12-hour ride to Cebu City to get a flight home. He says the ferry had at least 500 people on board, and was overloaded. Based on experience at sea during Vietnam, Shortcut believes the boat would have capsized in rougher seas.

"This is really happening and if there would have been a swell out at sea that night that thing would have went down, guaranteed," Shortcut said.

But he made it back to Tomahawk. His fiance is staying with her family until they get back up on their feet. They'll get married sometime when she gets back.

After all of this he knows they can weather any storm.

Related Weblinks:
UNICEF Typhoon Fund

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com


Play Video

RHINELANDER - Most people have a yearly tradition when it comes to celebrating Thanksgiving. For one Rhinelander restaurant, giving back to the community has been a tradition for a decade.

+ Read More

Play Video

EAGLE RIVER - Every northern county in Wisconsin will make an effort to increase deer populations until 2017.

That was recommended by the County Deer Advisories Committees.

"Deer hunting stays the same," County Deer Advisories Committee Chairman for Vilas County Ken Anderson said. "Hours of sometime boredom interrupted by moments of shear adrenaline rush and I still get that adrenaline rush when I see that buck."

Anderson shot his first buck on public land in Vilas County 56 years ago.

"10 pointer, north of Star Lake in the Bear Springs area in those high oak ridges and everyone says well you're done now, you might as well quit," said Anderson.

He didn't quit. He's hunted in the Wisconsin deer season 58 years in a row. He bought his 40 acres of land in Eagle River in the 1970s. Now he's the chairman of the Wisconsin Conservation Congress and CDAC in Vilas County.

+ Read More

RHINELANDER - A family-favorite pastime of hitting the movies after Thanksgiving dinner could take a bit of a hit this year.

Rouman Cinema in Rhinelander saw steady business early Thursday afternoon.  "The Hunger Games" finale drew the most movie fans to the early showings, but bad weather and the Packers game could mean smaller crowds at night.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - Many people share a meal and conversation with family and friends on Thanksgiving, but some people could miss out if they have to work or don't have family nearby. 

To help out people who are in that situation, North Country Vineyard and Grace Foursquare Churches delivered free Thanksgiving meals Thursday.

Volunteers packaged meals Thursday morning and started delivering them around noon.

+ Read More

Play Video

ANTIGO - A pair of turkeys likely destined for someone's Thanksgiving dinner table will instead live out long and happy lives thanks to their daring escape.

The turkeys were in a truck headed down Highway 29 in Wausau Sunday morning. Their crate fell off the back of the truck and onto the highway.  Another driver called police, but somehow the birds weren't hit by cars.

+ Read More

RHINELANDER - Not everyone has time to go to the gym during the holiday season, but there still steps you can take to stay active at home.

"While you're watching TV, you can be on the ground doing sit-ups or planksójust anything," says Sheri Gaber, a fitness specialist at personal trainer at Tone Zone Fitness in Rhinelander. "Just keep moving. Keep that sedentary time down."

+ Read More

VILAS COUNTY - An economic group in Vilas County can thank a local casino for a recent donation.

The Lake of the Torches Resort Casino presented members of the Vilas County Economic Development Corporation  with a $2,000 donation earlier this month.

+ Read More
+ More General News

Click Here