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NEWS STORIES

Remembering President Kennedy in the NorthwoodsSubmitted: 11/22/2013

Lauren Stephenson
5 p.m. Anchor/Reporter
lstephenson@wjfw.com


RHINELANDER - We will all experience at least one moment in life we'll never forget.

For many people, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy was one of those moments.

"Everybody couldn't imagine...What happened?" remembers Shirley Swearingen.

"I was confused and shocked. And watched it on TV," adds Susan Piazza.

Fred Kauzrich loved politics growing up. The news of President Kennedy's assassination came as a shock: "It's something that doesn't happen usually in most people's lifetimes."

Walter Meyer remembers where he was when he heard the news.

"I was working at the Rhinelander Paper Company and one of the supervisors came out and told me that President Kennedy had just been assassinated," he recalls.

"It was parent-teacher conferences that day," says Susan Piazza. "My parents went to my teachers to find out how I was doing and they came out after the conference and they were crying. And I thought, 'Oh my goodness, I didn't realize I had done that badly.' But that was not the case at all."

Sam Metoyier was serving a tour of duty in Schweinfurt, West Germany.

"I was with the Third Division. And I was out in the field and everybody in our forces would tell us that, 'Hey, you know Kennedy just got shot?' And we all said a prayer for him at the time," he recalls. "It was very hard on the military forces because we knew we could expect anything from our enemies. We knew that we had to stand our ground and just keep on going."

When asked how he thinks the day changed our country, Walter Meyer responds, "I often wonder what it would have been like if he wouldn't have been assassinated, how much of a change he'd have made in the country."

Though 50 years ago, the anniversary "brings back emotion and a whole lot of thought about what happened that day, and the fact that it happened shortly after, a few years after, to his brother. That it is real. It did happen. And it's a sad day for everyone," says Piazza.

Walter Meyer sums up why it's important to commemorate the anniversary.

"You have to remember history. If you don't remember history, you tend to repeat it."

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