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Northwoods Spotlight - Deer hunters ready for openerSubmitted: 11/20/2013
Story By Joe Dufek


RHINELANDER - Thousands of deer hunters are getting ready for the nine-day firearms season. Many are getting in some last minute practice before they hit the woods.

"That's always fun, getting my 13-year old son out," Rhinelander deer hunter Mike Luse explains. "He doesn't get to shoot alot. Looking for areas to hunt - checking out the good spots."

While the hunt itself is exciting, many fathers use the hunt as a great chance to get closer with their childern learning the sport.


"The anticipation is there," Tom Larson of Rhinelander adds. "I got a spot I'm going. I know there is at least three or four big deer out there. I'm hoping my kid gets one. I ain't worried about him. I want him to get one."

Tom's son, Al Schrampe is looking forward to, "having some fun with my dad, because we didn't get to go in the woods last year. He had a heart transplant in December, so we didn't get to go hunting."

Nov 23rd marks the latest hunters will don the blaze orange to go hutning. Game officials say the lates start, plus the rough spring expereienced earlier this year could be factors for a slow hunt.

DNR wildlife biologist Jeremy Holtz explains, "We see as much as a 15% drop in buck harveswt compared to when we start earlier in the rut. The weather is a little bit warmer and people are a little more comfortable in the stands. We got a large amount of snow and it stuck around in May. We know coming in our harvest was down. That's why we were a little conservative with the doe tags."

"I think the deer population is up a little bit," Larson says. "A lot of people didn't get deer last year. I know I was one of them."

The firearms season sends Sunday December 1st.


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