Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Sheriff's office uses education as tool to fight synthetic drug issuesSubmitted: 11/03/2013
Story By Adam Fox

Sheriff's office uses education as tool to fight synthetic drug issues
ANTIGO - More than 50 people met Saturday morning for a Langlade County Sheriff's Office drug presentation in Antigo.

The focus was on synthetic drugs, specifically bath salts, and their impact in the community.

Langlade County Sheriff's Office Drug Investigator Dan Bauknecht emphasized the physical impact of using bath salts.

He says the mood swing caused by synthetic drug can shift from friendly to violent in an instant.

It's something that puts users, family members and police in danger.

Police say that's because the bath salts essentially overload your nervous system. Mood swings can last for hours.

Bauknecht sees that more often when they arrest users.

"The real danger to these synthetic drugs is obviously they are not regulated because they're illegal street drugs," Bauknecht said. "The chemical compound is often times very different from bag to bag, even though its promoted to be the same brand."

Bauknecht started working at the Langlade County Jail in 1999. He says bath salts first started popping up in the area in 2009.

"I think it really got entrenched in our community and got entrenched in the outlying communities around us." Bauknecht said. "Then when it did become banned and people were too far gone on it so to speak to just stop because it was an illegal substance, so it became an underground substance."

The Sheriff's office hopes education sessions like the one they held in Antigo Saturday can help.

The goal was to let people know what is out on their streets. Bauknecht says the battle is more than just arresting users.

"This is more than just cops and robbers with bath salts because of the challenges with it and because of the catastrophic damage that it causes the person and our community, which is a trickle down," Bauknecht said.

According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, poison centers recorded 2,677 calls for exposure to bath salts.



Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

TOMAHAWK - To sisters Kathy and Julia, Thanksgiving Day is about more than just turkey, potatoes, and prep work. 

"[It's] kind of always been a special holiday for my parents, who are no longer with us," said Julia Pankow. 

Kathy and Julia grew up in a large family with 11 other siblings, which meant a Thanksgiving Day meal was always as big in heart as it was in size.  

+ Read More

Play Video

CONOVER - People in Conover and Phelps came together with an idea to connect the two communities by bike trail. Seven years later, the Great Headwaters Trail foundation can see the end of that trail. 

Construction of the first 9 miles of the trail were completed this fall. The trail needs a little more than 2 miles until it's connected to Phelps.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - For the last six years, chambers of commerce across the state collected more than 100,000 items for the Department of Tourism's Big Bundle Up campaign.

The drive collects warm clothing for people who can't afford it. 

The Rhinelander Area Chamber of Commerce donates the items it collects to Warm for Winter in Rhinelander. 

+ Read More

ASHLAND - The Ashland School district suspends a teacher because of a social media post that followed the shooting death of a Native American student.

Ashland Superintendent Keith Hilts says the posts by Ojibwe language instructor Sandra Gokee were defamatory and inflammatory.

+ Read More

DURAND - A conservation club in northwestern Wisconsin says it will mount an albino deer accidentally shot by a hunter and use it as a teaching tool.

The state Department of Natural Resources says the hunter who mistakenly shot the white deer contacted authorities after learning he had killed the protected animal in Pepin County.

+ Read More

Play Video

MERRILL - Merrill could be the newest local school district to rely on referendum money in its school budget.

The district faces a $1.8 million dollar operating deficit for next school year, and it has had to take from savings for years to keep the school running.

"We've been making cuts, and we've gotten in the habit of making cuts. Unfortunately, we became very good at making cuts," said Superintendent Dr. John Sample.

A consultant's survey got more than 1,600 responses from people in the district. It shows two-thirds of respondents support some sort of referendum to help pay for schools.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - Paging through sales flyers, setting your alarm clock extra early, and standing in line with hundreds of people usually go hand in hand on Black Friday.

It's a day retail stores have to prepare for in advance and a day shoppers can't wait for because of those deals. 

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 





Click Here