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NEWS STORIES

Paranormal expert visits Newswatch 12Submitted: 10/30/2013
Lauren Stephenson
5 p.m. Anchor/Reporter
lstephenson@wjfw.com


RHINELANDER - You may see ghosts and goblins trick-or-treating on Halloween night.

But what if there's an actual ghost in your house?

People debate if ghosts even exist.

We wanted to speak with a local paranormal historian about his experiences.

"I'm so fascinated by it that I don't get that fear because I'm so curious. I think the curiosity overrides that," says paranormal historian Kevin Malek.

Some people might think his hobby is scary.

But nothing fascinates him more than paranormal investigations.

"We just go out looking to document evidence on paranormal and supernatural kind of occurrences," he adds.

Malek started the Northern Wisconsin Paranormal Society five years ago.

Its 12 members investigate everything from ghosts to Big Foot sightings.

Some homeowners even call them to their homes to investigate strange occurrences.

"People will be like, 'You know, we've got this going on.' 'We got that going on.' 'My kids can't sleep,' or, 'It's really bugging me out.' So it's like, 'Okay, we've got to figure out what's here and how many,'" Malek explains.

In one video from a home in Arbor Vitae, Kevin unscrews a flashlight so it won't turn on.

When they ask for the spirit to turn on the flashlight, it turns on.

"We set the cameras up. You know, the night-vision cameras in the different rooms and what not. Try to set up cameras where things have happened or where things are expected to happen."

Kevin uses cameras because he believes not everything can be seen by the human eye unless it's played back.

For example, Kevin shot video at an abandoned home outside Rhinelander. Something appeared to float by in the video.

We figured we'd have Kevin do an investigation of our Newswatch 12 studios to know once and for all, if it's haunted.

The first stop was in our conference room to see if there was any paranormal electromagnetic energy.

"The theory is ghosts are made up of electromagnetic energy...You can interact with them. So for instance if there were to pass their hands through this, it would spike," explains Malek.

The device didn't pick up on any paranormal activity so we went to the studio to try another test.

SOT (KM): "Give me your name in here as well...How many are there of you?" Malek called out.

He was using an Electric Voice Phenomenon or EVP device.

It records frequencies humans can't hear until it's played back.

"When a EVP comes through, you see that needle move even though you can't hear with your ears," he said.

The last stop on our ghost hunt was in the station's attic.

Again, we tried the EVP test. We didn't get any responses.

"So the verdict is no ghosts in the Channel 12 studios?" I asked.

"No ghosts," responded Malek.

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