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Police turn to community to get prescription drugs off street Submitted: 10/27/2013
Story By Shardaa Gray


RHINELANDER - Old drug prescriptions usually sit in the back of your cabinet.

When you find them, you might throw them away.

But that could help someone's addiction.

No questions, no names; just bring in the pills.

The Rhinelander Police Department wants your help to tackle drug addiction.

"It's an opportunity for citizens to bring in all unused prescription medication in pill form into the police department," said Rhinelander Police Patrol Officer, Amanda Young.

"We don't ask any questions. We don't ask where they got it. We don't even want to know their name. It gives them an opportunity to bring it in, get rid of it and kind of just get it off the street."

Rhinelander joined the National Prescription Drug "Take Back" Day.

They want to cut prescription drug abuse.

"There is a high rate of addiction with prescription medication," Young said.

"Even if you just get the medication, somebody else in the house or somebody else that brings into the house can see that in your medicine cabinet and take it away. It would be contributing to the prescription problem that we have."

These drugs are passed along to the Drug Enforcement Agency.

They destroy it.

What they don't want you to do is flush it or pour it down your sink.

"It has a potential of obviously getting into your septic system. That has a potential of leaking out into the ground," said Young.

"Eventually it would go down to aquifer, which is the water supply underneath the permeable rock. That has the potential of polluting our water system."

You can still drop old drugs off in the front lobby of the police department.

Make sure it's in a pill form.

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