Partial shutdown slows sporting goods store's openingSubmitted: 10/10/2013
Story By Adam Fox

Partial shutdown slows sporting goods store's opening
HAWKINS - The partial government shutdown means more than just arguing between political parties.

The National parks have closed, federal workers have been furloughed and death benefits to soldiers killed in action have been delayed.

But the shutdown can be felt in smaller ways here in Wisconsin.

Old School Sporting Goods opened in Hawkins in September. Right now they are focusing on archery.

That's because they haven't been able to get the proper federal permit to sell firearms.

The store did get approved for a federal firearm license required to sell guns.

But Kristin Brand, who works at the sporting goods store, says she can't start selling guns until they physically receive the permit.

"Now we are waiting on the government to get back into session so that we can actually obtain our permit and get it posted," Brand said. "Then we will be bringing in pistols and long guns."

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco Firearms and Explosives deals with the licenses and permits.

Brand says the employees who handle the permits have been furloughed, causing the delay.

The store plans to continue selling bows and other archery gear until the government reopens.

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