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Hodag volleyball avenges earlier defeat, takes down AntigoSubmitted: 10/04/2013

Ben Meyer
Executive Producer
bmeyer@wjfw.com

RHINELANDER - The Rhinelander High School volleyball team gave Antigo a positive Bell Game preview Thursday night, taking down the Red Robins in four games.

The Hodags recovered from a 5-0 deficit in Game One to rally back, taking the match 25-22, 25-14, 22-25, 25-17.

Rhinelander avenged an earlier loss to Antigo and pulled back to even in the Great Northern Conference at 4-4. The Robins fell to 4-4.

Senior captain Katie Berrell led a balanced attack with 18 kills. Riley Aschenbrenner chipped in 14 kills, while Brianna Gilbert added 13.

"I said, just keep (Berrell) in the middle and let her find her rhythm. She doesn't need to destroy the ball every time she touches it. She just needs to keep the ball in bounds and get a feel for how the game was going," Hodags coach Paul Mildebrandt said.

Mildebrandt was especially pleased with Aschenbrenner's night.

"Riley put on a clinic tonight. I told Lexi (Haug), our setter, that Riley should. When you're a head taller than anyone else on the court, I said, keep feeding her. She started blocking their tips, she started blocking their attacks. She got into their heads, really quick," he said.

Haug had 69 assists on the evening.

Antigo was without the injured Caroline Roller, who stands second in the conference in kills per game average.

"The part we focused on tonight was playing with a really active back row, both defensively and off the serve receive. Antigo, with the injuries that they had, didn't really have anyone that was going to offensively hurt us. They were going to be looking for more of a spot game. They were going to be looking more to keep the ball in the court," Mildebrandt said.

Rhinelander started off poorly, dropping the first five points of the match to the Red Robins. However, they ended up fighting back to take a 13-12 lead, and later put away the game by three points.

"We did start out a little sluggish. With it being Homecoming week, the girls have had a lot on their mind. We dug our way out of that game," Mildebrandt said.

A five-point scoring streak in the middle of Game Two served as a springboard to a 25-14 Hodags victory.

"Once our defensive started to pick up, we started to play a lot better, and we saw the score change," Mildebrandt said.

The Rhinelander coach used Game Three to get playing time for lesser-used players like Alyssa Ellis, Kyle Glinski, McKayla Smith, and Yvonne Gardner. That seemed to throw the team off, and contributed to the loss.

"It did affect some of our starters, because you're used to playing with the normal players," he said.

However, the Hodags used four straight points during Gardner's serve to take Game Four, 25-17.

Rhinelander next returns to the court Monday at Wausau East. They resume GNC play on Tuesday at Mosinee.

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 IN OTHER NEWS
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 05/27/2016

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We'll bring you the details on these stories and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

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WAUSAU - During a national push to prescribe fewer painkillers, a new Wisconsin proposal appeared that it would let chiropractors prescribe prescription drugsâ€"including painkillers.

After speaking with one of the bill's authors, that notion is not at all true. 

John Murray, the executive director of the Wisconsin Chiropractic Association, which supports the bill, said it was never the bill's intention to include narcotics, or any drugs not related to neuro-muscular skeletal healing. The bill is in its early stages, having had a co-sponsor hearing on Tuesday, and future drafts of the bill will not have that broad language. 

"It is the position of the WCA that going forward that was never the intention and that's not the intention going forward to have opioids and highly addictive schedules to be part of this," Murray said. 

What the bill is meant for, he said, is to allow chiropractorsâ€"with 60 credit hours of additional education and hours of clinical trainingâ€"to be able to prescribe non-narcotic pain medication, such as muscle relaxants or steroids. This they could do instead of referring their patients out to a medical doctor for such prescriptions, as all chiropractors do now. He said this would make it more convenient for the patient and better that they see the same doctor for a medication instead of two. 

"It's not that we think referring out to other providers is a bad thing," Murray said. "But there are situations in which a patient comes in and has something that a chiropractor with proper training could treat in the short term with some pharmaceutical intervention."

Not all chiropractors agree with this bill despite its clarifications. 

Dr. Scott Bautch, D.C., of Bautch Chiropractic in Wausau, wants to stay true to being "the non-drug option" to health care. 

He would rather continue referring his patients out to medical doctors.  He presented on behalf of the Chiropractic Society of Wisconsin, which does not support the bill, at the bill's hearing in Madison on Tuesday. 

"I'm going to counsel people on what they eat, I'm going to counsel people on how they move, I'm going to counsel people on what they think," Bautch said. "But if we need to have help with something your body can't heal, I'll refer you out. In my 33 years plus of practice, I've not had a problem. And if I've had to send a patient out because the pain was so unretractable, it's not been a difficult situation at all. If I call them that day, I've had patients that we call, and they get them in in an hour."

Murray says it's up to each chiropractor in the state to decide how they want to practice.

"We have great respect for chiropractors who want to work that way," Murray said. "But there are chiropractors in the state who want to have those extra clinical tools and practice that way. It's about freedom of practice."

The bill still has a few legislative steps before, and if, it becomes law.


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MADISON - A new report says Wisconsin's job creation agency has erroneously awarded more than $412,000 in tax credits to companies over how many jobs they created.

The Wisconsin State Journal reports the detail came out in a review by the Wisconsin Economic Development Corp. The agency first revealed the tax credit issue at a board meeting last month, but Thursday's report was the first time the size of the problem was detailed.

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MADISON - A federal trial to help decide whether Wisconsin Assembly district boundaries Republicans redrew five years discriminate against Democrats is set to wrap up.

A group of voters who support Democrats sued last year alleging new districts Republican lawmakers created in 2011 marginalize Democrats and consolidate GOP power.

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AMHERST - The small town of Amherst recently broke ground on a project to replace its aging dam.

The dam was built on the Tomorrow River decades ago to power the local feed mill.

But now the Wisconsin DNR believes the structure does not meet it's 500-year flood criteria, so it gave the town a choice.

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HILES - Community members got together to celebrate some students' hard work Thursday afternoon. Students from Crandon High School built a visitors' kiosk in Hiles.

There was a ribbon cutting Thursday to announce that the kiosk is officially open. About 15 students built the kiosk.

It features community events, trail maps, and more for everyone to use.

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PRENTICE/OGEMA - Prentice High School senior Aubrey Edinger likes making art with all different kinds of materials. She makes pottery, oil paintings, acrylic paintings, and drawings, among other works.

But it was a sculpture with polymer clay that earned her all-conference recognition in a recent Northwoods art show. Her "Fight Scene" piece was selected as one of the best in the Marawood Conference.

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