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Sisters trying to make it big on old tunesSubmitted: 09/29/2013
Story By Adam Fox

Sisters trying to make it big on old tunes
MINOCQUA - Kids these days love singing songs from artists like Taylor Swift, Ke$ha, and Lil Wayne.

But one Wisconsin singing trio goes in a different direction.

They go by Trisis because they're three singing sisters. Jessica, 17, Jacqueline, 13 and Jasmine, 10.

They sing at events around Wisconsin, including this weekend's Beef-O-Rama in Minocqua.

Their grandmother Cheri Krier made sure they learned good music when they were young.

"I lived with this family as each one of them were born and they started singing when they were little," Krier said. "One day I told them you better learn some songs."

Krier taught them Sugartime and other vintage songs from the 1920s thru the 50s.

Jessica, the oldest in TRISIS, still remembers Krier teaching her Sugartime.

"She would sit us on the front porch and she brought out her records and we were like what is that," Jessica said."So then she brought out her record player and showed us."

The girls go to virtual school, which helps them go to more events and shows.

David, their father, plays the guitar to round out the family band.

"Just to be traveling together and just having that family connection is really incredible," Jessica said. "It's something that's a once in a lifetime opportunity and I'm so happy that i have it."

They also perform with the summer concert non-profit Big Top Chautauqua near Bayfield.




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