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NEWS STORIES

Field trips important to virtual schoolsSubmitted: 09/23/2013
Story By Dan McKinney


WAUSAU - Field trips can be a fun way for students to spend the day outside the classroom. That's especially important when the classroom is a computer at home.

Going on a field trip to a dairy farm would be a fun valuable learning experience for just about any kid. But for kids like Keegan Fischer, it's even more valuable. That's because Keegan goes to virtual school.

"I like going to a virtual school because I won't be pressured by going into a real school, and actual physical school," says Keegan Fischer, a student at the Wisconsin Connection Academy. "Here I can take my time, and work whenever so it's flexible for me anytime."

Wisconsin Connection Academy is also flexible for Keegan's mom, Sarah Fischer.

"We choose Connections Academy because Keegan had health issues when he was smaller so he missed a lot of school," says Sarah Fischer. "This has been a good fit, it has worked great."

But the downside of virtual school is that students don't get as much time to interact with each other. That's why Keegan and his mom Sarah spent the day away from the computer.

"In a virtual school you're not getting the same kind of socialization as if you're going to a regular traditional bricks and mortar school," says Jennifer Dikeman a Math teacher at Connections Academy.

"We put a lot of time and effort into these field trips and we really want our students to attend these so they can get out get out of the house get away from the computer and talk to other families that are here," says Dikeman.

The field trip to Wilkes Farm is one of many throughout the school year.

"The field trips are a great place for students to just put names to faces as well as teachers," says Michele Lynch a social studies teacher at Connections Academy. "They get to meet their teachers we get to build more personal relationships find out more have good laughs with each other."

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