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NEWS STORIES

New technology in third grade classroomsSubmitted: 09/16/2013
Story By Dan McKinney


MERRILL - Teachers don't spend all day teaching with chalkboards and overhead projectors anymore. This year, third grade students at Washington Elementary started using iPads in the classroom.

"We need to prepare students for that paperless world," says third grade Washington Elementary School teacher Kim Cruz-Uribe.

In Miss Cruz's third grade classroom, that means students use iPads instead of pencil and paper.


"It's a very important 21st century skill that students need to have," says Cruz-Uribe.

For the students, it's less about the future and more about having fun.

"I like how we go to the tumble book because they make the books really funny," says third grade student Harley Hixon.

"They just don't want to stop learning and that's the most exciting thing for me about the technology, it engages them in a way a chalkboard can't," says Cruz-Uribe.

"iPads are really smart and so they can teach you a lot more," says Hixon.

Hixon has learned to think critically about what he reads online.

"Sometimes but not all the time because sometimes people can put wrong stuff on the internet and then you'll think it's true and it's not true," says Hixon.

Cruz-Uribe is there to help make those decisions.

"Teachers can be smarter than iPads," says Hixon

His teacher is smart enough to know just how important iPads are.

"This is where we're going with education where we're going with jobs. It's not paper and pencil anymore," says Cruz-Uribe.





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