NEWS STORIES

Accused Wausau killer looks to have evidence thrown outSubmitted: 08/20/2013

Ben Meyer
Executive Producer
bmeyer@wjfw.com


WAUSAU - We hear it often in police dramas on TV - policemen telling suspects they have
the right to a lawyer.

But what counts as asking for a lawyer?

That was the question in the Marathon County Courthouse on Tuesday.

Zachary Froehlich appeared in court.

He's the Wausau man accused of beating another man to death last June.

The case could be decided on the testimony of Wausau police detectives.

One of them remembered his interrogation of Froehlich a day after the beating.

"I asked him who swung the bat," Wausau Police Detective Nathan Cihlar said on the witness stand. "I tried to clarify that a little bit. He stopped me, and said, I'll tell you. I'll tell you, but can I have a cigarette first?"

Froehlich then told detectives he swung the bat that killed Kerby Kneiss.

But Froehlich's defense attorney says that admission may have come after Froehlich asked for a lawyer.

The judge didn't make a decision on the evidence on Tuesday.

If she throws out the confession, it could harm the prosecution's case against him.

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