Loading

47°F

50°F

52°F

48°F

46°F

50°F

52°F

56°F

46°F

46°F

56°F

52°F
Search
NEWS STORIES

Leaves have started to change colors but it's not because of the weatherSubmitted: 08/16/2013
Story By Melissa Constanzer


ACROSS THE NORTHWOODS - Look around you and you may notice signs of autumn. We're already starting to see leaves changing colors but experts say this is nothing new for August.

Summer has been on the chilly side of normal. But that is not the cause of some trees in the Northwoods starting to show color.

"What makes them turn is primarily triggered by the day length. As the days get shorter, that's what makes start turning, getting ready for winter," says Jerry Van Cleve, U.S. Forest Service Silviculturist.

There are also other factors that lead to leaves changing. Some may have diseases that can contribute early change.

"The ones that I notice, just the loners that turn early. Usually those tend to red maple. But yeah, you'll see any tree that's under stress will kind of go to yellow whether it's an Aspen, or a Birch, or an Elm," says Jerry Van Cleve.

But give the healthy trees a month or so and they'll be ready to change too. And this year's fall season should be a brightly colored one.

"I think it's going to be a good year, you know, we got some of the ingredients in place. We got a nice wet spring and the summer hasn't been exceedingly hot or dry," said Jerry Van Cleve.

So as long as we get some nice days with above freezing nights, we'll see a lot of vivid colors this fall.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

Play Video

MADISON - The state Senate has approved a raise for state troopers and a new compensation plan for other state workers but has delayed debate on the state budget.

+ Read More

Play Video

SUGAR CAMP - There could soon be new regulations for unarmed combat sports. The proposed changes would impact the number of competitors here in the Northwoods.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - Most of the time when you give blood it's in a clinic. But once a year in Rhinelander, organizers bring the process outside.

Tuesday, tents filled up with donors at Pioneer Park for the 6th annual "Hodag MASH Blood Drive."

More than a dozen nurses and workers with the Community Blood Center interviewed, tested and collected blood from donors.

Organizer Jerry Shidell chose the military theme as a unique way to reduce people's anxiety.  Shidell says it doesn't matter what reason you choose to give as long as you do.

+ Read More

Play Video

MADISON - Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald says Gov. Scott Walker's office had a hand in crafting a budget amendment scaling back the state's open records law.

+ Read More

Play Video

FLORENCE - People in some areas of Wisconsin may take easy access to groceries for granted. People in Florence don't.

Last year, the USDA considered the Florence area a "food desert". There was no grocery store in all of Florence County, and it had been that way for seven years.

That's all changed. Pat's Foods has now been open for a year in town.

A vacant space in Florence looked like a slab of concrete with a roof a year ago. Now, Pat's Foods stays busy every day at the location. The full service grocery store supplies food and fresh produce, meats, and dairy. That convenience means people are shopping steadily at Pat's, and business is good.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - The Hodag Water Shows team could add some new tricks to its performances. The team is currently working on its barefoot skills with one of the world's best barefoot skiers.

"It's a little more high pace, a little more intense, but it's a lot of fun," says Ben Groen of the World Barefoot Center.

+ Read More

Play Video

EAGLE RIVER - If you want a new summer activity, look no further than Eagle River. A new art studio offers many different classes to kids and adults. 

"We've been here for a month, but the organization has been together for about three years," said Summer Program Director Erica Bush. "We're very excited to be in our own building finally."

Classes can cost anywhere from $20 to $50. People can sign up for classes ahead of time or just walk into the center. Program directors think it's important for kids to get involved in art early on.

"It's the creativity that the kids learn about," said Bush. "Creativity can go into all different aspects—math, science—it's everywhere. So enforcing art when they're really young will really lead to a more intelligent future for these kids."

The center offers anything from painting to pottery to cooking. Kids shared why they love to take art classes.
"You could just grab a piece of paper or something and then you can just doodle on it," said 4th grader Nicholas Fluegel. 

"It's really calming, and there's no bad way to do art," said 6th grader Grace Florence.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here