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Tuning into a different kind of retirementSubmitted: 08/02/2013
Story By Lex Gray


RHINELANDER - From the outside, Jeff Santy's house looks like a typical retiree's dream: a view of the lake, and peace and quiet.

But Santy's retirement dream is a little different.

"You don't have to be a rock star to feel like one," Santy says.

Santy helps people feel and act like rock stars. He started teaching music and bringing bands together after he retired from teaching English at Rhinelander High School in 2006.

"Sometimes the kids come to me and say, ‘Here's four or five of my friends, we want to be in a band, we've got a name for the band, we've got matching jackets,' and I'll say ‘What do you play?' and they'll say ‘Oh no, no, that's up to you.'"

It's not always kids living the rock star dream.

"I've had a gal who was retired just a few years ago from teaching, and she said I've always wanted to be a drummer," Santy says. "She was 57 years of age and when she started, she said ‘I should have started this 50 years ago.'"

Carly Reich started playing guitar and keyboard when she was 15 years old.

"My brother had put ads up all over town looking for band members and he got no responses," Reich says.

Two years ago, Reich and her brother found Santy's Tunesmith Academy. Santy helped them bring their band, Violet Skies, together.

"I tried taking private lessons, I tried teaching myself, and I tried playing as a group lesson," Reich says."I think the main thing for me was, there's an obligation to the other people in your band to keep getting better and to keep up with what you've learned. So that makes me a lot less likely to slack off."

Tunesmith Academy is fun for the bands and fun for Jeff, but how does it fit in with the quiet Lake George community?

"We got a phone call once when we were pumping the music, and I thought ‘Uh-oh, there's the sheriff's department calling me and saying you gotta shut this down,'" Santy says. "And yet it was someone across the lake calling with a request. They wanted to hear a certain song."

A certain song that brings you back to a time when anything was possible.

"I think kids dream of being sports stars or rock stars," he says. "I can't help them with the sports star end of it, but I can help them with the music end of it."

Violet Skies and other Tunesmith Academy bands will play this weekend at the Oneida County Fair.

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 IN OTHER NEWS

EAGLE RIVER - The streets in Eagle River got an extra wash on Tuesday and not just from the rain.

The Light and Water Utility spent most of the day flushing fire hydrants.

The city flushes the hydrants twice a year, once in the spring and fall.

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RHINELANDER - People in Rhinelander will be able to cast their November election ballots starting on Friday.
It's the earliest people in Wisconsin have ever been able to vote.

The absentee ballots are stacked and ready for Friday at the Rhinelander City Clerk's office.
To make the early voting process go as smoothly as possible, you will need to come prepared.

"When you come in make sure that you're registered. That is important. Make sure you're registered in the city if you're coming into us," said Clerk Valerie Foley.

Registering is easy; all you need is a photo ID and proof of residence.
The registration form takes a couple of minutes, and then you will be able to fill out an election ballot.

"I think it is going to be a very busy day. I think people are pretty interested in the issues. And I think a lot of them would like to get and make sure they can vote if they're not certain they're going to make it to the polls in November or not," said Foley.

The clerk's office has already sent out about 200 ballots to people who have requested them.

Now, it is preparing for the early voter in-person rush.

If you are unsure whether you are registered to vote or where to go for early voting, the clerk's office suggests voters visit myvote.wi.gov for more information.



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RHINELADER - Nicolet College selected two students to represent the technical college this school year as student ambassadors.

Faculty members first nominated the students, then they interviewed for the positions.

District Student Ambassador, Samantha Zalewski, from Sayner, says this is an opportunity for her to give back to the college.

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What We're Working OnSubmitted: 09/27/2016

- Tonight on Newswatch 12:

Yesterday two people safely escaped a fire that badly damaged a house in Sugar Camp. It turned out that a cat could have been a victim, but the cat was rescued by a firefighter. We'll bring you details and show you the cat that was slightly injured and is recovering.

We'll tell you about a Plaza that might be built in Boulder Junction.

And you'll hear from the Rhinelander city clerk on preparations for early voting which begins this Friday.

We'll bring you the details on these stories and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

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MADISON - UW Credit Union has expanded its membership eligibility to include all current and former college students, a move Gov. Scott Walker is touting as way to help countless students refinance their loans.

The governor and credit union officials announced the expansion at a news conference on Tuesday.

Until now the credit union has served only current and past University of Wisconsin System and Madison Area Technical College students. It offers interest rates ranging from 2.2 percent to 6.8 percent.

Walker, a Republican, called the expansion another step in help students and alumni.

Scot Ross, executive director of liberal group One Wisconsin Now, told reporters after the news conference that the expansion likely won't help anyone because students and recent graduates typically lack collateral and a credit history.

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MADISON - The heavy rains that have caused flooding and landslides in parts of Wisconsin have also saturated the soil at record levels around the state.

The Wisconsin State Journal reports that surplus moisture was found in 40 percent of the state's topsoil last week and 35 percent of its subsoil. Those are the highest levels for September and could raise the risk of future flooding.

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WASHINGTON - The Senate has blocked a spending bill needed to keep the government open beyond Friday's midnight deadline.

Most Democrats and at least 10 Republicans voted to block the bill, which also funds the fight against the Zika virus. Democrats are demanding money to help Flint, Michigan, address its lead-tainted water crisis.

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