Loading

49°F

47°F

52°F

47°F

48°F

54°F

52°F

52°F

48°F

53°F

52°F

52°F
NEWS STORIES

Local firefighters on a missionSubmitted: 07/27/2013

Lauren Stephenson
5 p.m. Anchor/Reporter
lstephenson@wjfw.com


TOMAHAWK - We all want to honor fallen firefighters.

But it takes money to maintain memorials.

So a Northwoods chapter of the Red Knights Firefighters Motorcycle Club hit the road to benefit the Wisconsin State Firefighters Memorial.

Red Knights Road Captain Reverend Norman Peterson says,"This year we decided to move to this date for warmer weather so it's 48 degrees right now."

The weather may not have been what they hoped for, but nothing could stop these firefighters from completing their mission: a mission to raise money and honor a local fallen firefighter.

"We're hosting a ride to benefit the Wisconsin State Firefighters Memorial in Wisconsin Rapids…It's important to raise money for the memorial to keep awareness of those who have given the ultimate sacrifice," says Red Knights Chapter 5 President Monty Timm.

Over the last 4 years, Red Knights Chapter 5 has raised more than 5,000 dollars.

"The ride is a registered ride. Riders pay a fee to go on the ride, plus we've gotten donations from a couple area fire departments and from the United Steel Workers local 215 in Rhinelander," explains Timm.

The memorial ride isn't just a fundraiser for the Wisconsin State Firefighter's memorial. It also gives these firefighters the opportunity to honor a fallen fireman.

"This year we are honoring Jamison Kampmeyer. He is from the Colby Fire Department. He died in a fire a year ago," Peterson says.

"He was just a good, all-around person. He was a police officer, a firefighter, an EMT, a father. He was really kind of a great human being all around and somebody that you could look up to," says Zach Cira, a Colby EMT.

He worked with Jamison Kampmeyer.

Cira wanted to honor his friend's memory so he made the trek from Colby to Tomahawk to join the memorial ride.

Even those who never knew Kampmeyer feel a special connection.

After all, it's a brotherhood.
"As Firefighters, men and women, we become a brotherhood…when one of us sacrifices their all for responding to a call, we need to honor them," says Peterson.

And honor fallen firemen they did when they stopped at the Colby Fire Station before ending their journey in Wisconsin Rapids.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

BROKAW - Two central Wisconsin towns may need to take on more than $3-million in debt from a neighboring village.

The towns of Texas and Maine could take on the village of Brokaw's assets and debt if it decides to dissolve.

A paper mill left Brokaw in 2011.

Now its water utility costs much more to operate than it brings in from customers.

+ Read More

TOMAH - Whistleblowers and family members of veterans who died at a Tomah Department of Veterans Affairs medical center say they want lawmakers to enforce accountability and reform the hospital.


+ Read More

Play Video

WISCONSIN - Gogebic Taconite won't seek an iron ore mine in northern Wisconsin, but the company's announcement last month isn't enough for the Sierra Club.

The environmental group wants a repeal of the state law that relaxed the mine permitting process.

+ Read More

Play Video

WAUSAU - Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-Wisconsin) doesn't like Indiana's new religious freedom law.

+ Read More

Play Video

MINOCQUA - In Wisconsin, the Great Lakes play an important role in our lives. A program in the Northwoods Wednesday night will take a closer look behind the science of those lakes.

This month's Science on Tap topic is "The Great Lakes, Great Challenges, Great Science." Dr. Jim Hurley from the UW-Madison Aquatic Sciences Center will be the featured speaker.

+ Read More

Play Video

MINOCQUA - The Badgers don't face Kentucky in the Final Four until Saturday, but Northwoods fans are already stocking up on their gear.

Employees at Packerland Plus in Minocqua have already seen plenty of fans come in to buy gear. They usually see their Badgers' sales increase between the Elite Eight and Final Four.

+ Read More

Play Video

MERRILL - Police used to teach people at schools and public places to stay put and hide if they faced an active shooter situation.

But the Merrill Police Department is helping to change that thinking.

Analysis of mass shootings shows people who run or fight back often have a better chance of survival.

For example, during the Virginia Tech shootings in 2007, 28 of the 30 people who were killed reacted passively, not proactively.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here