The risk of riding rides at County FairsSubmitted: 07/25/2013
Story By Lyndsey Stemm

ANTIGO - Last week a 52-year-old Dallas woman died after falling from one of the country's tallest roller coasters at Six Flags. Carnivals and fairs happen without incident every day throughout the summer across the country. But we often only hear about the rides when something tragic happens.

The Langlade County Fair is this weekend. The company that owns the rides at the fair is ANP Enterprise. The family owned business has been traveling to county fairs throughout Wisconsin for more than 40 years. So they're MORE than familiar with safety standards in the fair ride industry.

In addition to running the company, two of the brothers are also certified ride safety inspectors. They say keeping the rides safe is the REAL full time job when it comes to running this business. And it's not just something they worry about when setting up at a new location, it's every day.

"It's out on a midway and we start our visuals and walk-arounds and if there is something that is reported to us by the operator from the previous day, we take that as a priority and take a look at that stuff. It's every ride here. It's 21 rides that we have here and we go through everything," says David Kedrowicz, ANP Enterprise Owner.

The woman who died in Texas was said to have been too big for the roller coaster she was on. Enforcing those size limits can be a delicate task, but it's one Kedrowicz says they don't take lightly.

"We'd be setting ourselves up for some court dates down the road so we pleasantly tell them 'Look, we cannot ride you' and they either understand or they ride something else that they're appropriate sized for," said Kedrowicz.

The Kedrowicz brothers spend much of the off-season in safety seminars to keep up with the latest safety standards in the industry… and the state of Wisconsin does random inspections of all fair ride companies twice a year.

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MADISON - Wisconsin may be the dairy state, but we've seen a decline in the number of dairy farms.

A report from the federal Agriculture Department shows that Wisconsin lost almost 400 dairy farms in the last year.

About 94-thousand dairy herds were active in the state as of October 1st.

Wisconsin Dairy Business Association President Gordon Speirs says the number of lost farms this year is low compared to previous years.

Annual losses reached as high as 1-thousand in some years.

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RHINELANDER - Leaves cover the ground instead of snow, but that doesn't stop Ben Popp from dreaming.

"Hopefully it snows soon," said Popp.

The American Birkebeiner Executive Director visited the Northwoods Nordic Ski Club Wednesday. 

"Rhinelander has just an amazing situation here. We have this great venue out here at CAVOC, the Nordic Ski Club is really strong," Popp said.

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ST. GERMAIN - Helping patients feel better comes first for one pharmacist in St. Germain, but every Wednesday in October these patients are returning the favor by buying her cupcakes for a cause.

People know to head to pharmacist Jennifer Hansen when they're sick; however, many of them also know they can walk out of St. Germain Pharmacy with one of her cupcakes for Down Syndrome Awareness month.

This is the fourth year Jennifer is baking the cupcakes for her sons' Lakeland Area Special Olympics team.

One of her sons has Down Syndrome and the other has Autism.

"It's not about disabilities or what they can't do. It is shining and highlighting what they can do and all the many things they can do," said Hansen.

Donations from the cupcakes allowed her kids and fellow teammates to get new uniforms and head to different tournaments around the state.

Just as much as she knows patients by name, they know about her sons and always ask about them.

Jennifer says the generosity of the Northwoods community is overwhelming.

Many of her customers ask about the cupcakes months in advance to make sure they can donate.

"I'll still do them as long as my oven keeps working and nothing else bad happens," said Hansen.

Jennifer's boys and their teammates will be heading to Merrill for a bowling tournament this weekend.

Cupcake sales go through the end of October.

Jennifer also has cupcakes in exchange for donations in April for Autism Awareness Month.

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RHINELANDER - A Rhinelander mother always thought of her hometown as safe. That perspective changed in some ways last Tuesday when the woman's 12-year-old son raced into her office saying he was held hostage by a teen with a butcher knife.

Newswatch 12 is not identifying the woman, her son, or anyone involved, but instead we wanted to know what happened and what can be done to make sure it doesn't happen again.

The mother says her son and a friend decided to go to Hodag Park to play football in the afternoon of October 11.

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STELLA - The Northwoods saw more than four inches of rain from the big storm Monday night. All that rain left at least three Oneida County roads washed out, some completely impassable.

You can't get through Tenderfoot Road east of Rhinelander right now. There's about a roughly 15 foot deep crater and 10 foot gap in the road.

Stella Town Supervisor Bob Goodin says the culvert that was once there was washed away from all the rain.

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THREE LAKES - With the presidential election right around the corner, voters will be changing history for the United States.

For voters in the town of Three Lakes, they'll also be voting for a library, town office and possibly even a police department reconstruction plan. Wednesday evening, supporters of the Demmer Library came together to inform others in the community about that vote.

Members of the Three Lakes community that are in favor of expanding the Demmer Library joined forces to call every single registered voter in the area. 

"Just informing people about the referendum and for others I've found a lot of support. There are a lot of 'yes' votes out there and we're definitely grateful for that," said supporter Colette Mahlerwein.

For Laura Wipperman, her vote has already been decided.

"I love the idea of a campus kind of concept where people could get from one building to the other easily and share some spaces because I believe that's going to save us money in the long run," said Wipperman.

When voters see their ballots in now less than three weeks, they will also be asked how they feel about the proposed expansion project with the library, town offices and police department.

"I feel very passionate about not only keeping the library in Three Lakes but allowing it to thrive," said Wipperman.

The first question voters will see will be, "Do you support up to nine hundred thousand ($900,000) additional taxpayer dollars being placed on the levy for the Library expansion?"

"A 'yes' vote on question one would have an estimated annual impact of $7/year per $100,000 worth of value on your home for 20 years," said Mahlerwein.

The second question voters will see will be, "Do you support up to 1.8 million additional taxpayer dollars being placed on the levy to replace the existing structure for the Town Office, Police Department and Community Building with a new smaller structure?"

"A 'yes' vote on question two would have an $11 a year increase on your home valued at $100,000 for the next 20 years," said Mahlerwein.

After they crunched the numbers, Mahlerwein's family didn't have to go far to find the money.

"I can find that in spare change at my house. My girls and I actually did a little challenge to see if we could find that in spare change and we did," said Mahlerwein.

For those making phone calls on Wednesday night, their main goal was to educate the voters so that they are prepared to make a decision.

"I hope that it doesn't come as a surprise to anyone. I hope that the timing works out well because a presidential election brings out voters and that it will inspire people to vote and that they'll vote 'yes'," said Mahlerwein.

If you still have questions on the proposed plans, please call the Demmer Library at 715-546-3391.

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MARQUETTE, MI - Authorities say floodwaters that closed some roads in Michigan's Upper Peninsula are receding.

State police say U.S. highway 41 over the Chocolay River in Marquette County is open Wednesday along with most other area roads after being closed Tuesday due to water over the roadway. Michigan Route 94 west remained closed west of U.S. 41 due to a washout.

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